adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $18.89

Buy for $18.89

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Science and religion have always been considered mutually exclusive concepts, but are they really? Philosopher Ken Wilber shows how we might begin to think about science and religion in ways that allow for their reconciliation, on terms acceptable to both camps. Science is one of the most profound methods humans have devised for devining truth, and religion focuses on discerning meaning. Wilber shows that not only is science compatible with the world's religions, it is indeed necessary to unite the two. He presents an elegant and accessible program which is breathtaking in its scope - one that cannot fail to change the way you look at your world.
©1998 by Ken Wilber (P)1998 by Audio Renaissance Tapes, A Division of CPU, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"The author demonstrates a remarkable ability to examine and summarize disparate theories and to arrive at stimulating conclusions. The book is impeccably read by Denis deBoisblanc, and the production quality is of the highest order." (AudioFile)

What listeners say about The Marriage of Sense and Soul

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    74
  • 4 Stars
    38
  • 3 Stars
    17
  • 2 Stars
    16
  • 1 Stars
    9
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    33
  • 4 Stars
    12
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    2
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    33
  • 4 Stars
    10
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Toward Integrity in Science and Religion

Ken Wilber's Sense and Soul surpasses any other preseentation on the dialogue between science and spirituality. It explains in clear language what has lead to the impasse between these essential elements of culture and how a reapproachment can be made which honors the methods and practices of both. Wilber's unique contribution lies in his thorough knowledge of the Perennial tradition of deep faith and in his encyclopedic knowledge of the philsophy of science.

25 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Maybe a better read than listened to

I think this book, for some at least, would better to read, rather than having it read to them. It is rather dense and you must keep your mind well focused to follow it. Let your mind drift off to contemplate a thought it has provoked, and by the time you re-focus your attention the Audible reader may well have moved on to new territoty.

10 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Transformative!

An excellently read, significant and motivating book. Sophisticated, deep, yet easy to follow. Worth several listens.

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

integral theory at its best!

for everybody who always thought that there should be a way to integrate the undeniable facts of modern science and the rich truths of the world's wisdom traditions. brilliant, exciting, but nothing for listening to while not being fully concentrated.

8 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Wading through the density of life

This is a great book. For scientists, it will probably enrage them. New agers will probably get nervous. This book will clarifty what living on this planet is really about...and this book just gives a taste of what is possible. Enjoy it and share it!

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

loved it

cerebral & worth listening to & adding to one's functional way of thinking; ken wilber always has intelligent things to say : )

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Nonsense

He misrepresents both science and religion, then reconciles these misrepresentations by adding more unsupported nonsense.

I listened through to the end, hoping for something of value, but other than his bashing of postmodernism, I found nothing.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Print Companion Guide?

Any additional comments?

Seeing the comments on the density of the material and growing rather tired of typing notes in bookmarks, I remembered that it is mentioned early on in the audiobook that there is a companion guide to keep track of key points. I had to jump on here to see if there was indeed a printable file provided, but alas, there is not. So, I can get one for I Am a Pole and So Can You but not for this. Bummer.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Pretty Complex for an Audio Book

I liked this a great deal, though I do not agree completely with Wilber's position and will probably listen to it several more times. The narrator occasionally mispronounces a term, but this is rare enough that it does not hamper the listening. Although the author moves on, and you can lose material as you woolgather, it is also true that some topics are reworked repeatedly. There is a lot of review in this book, which can be helpful or irritating, depending on how intently you are trying to follow his arguments. I found it a helpful introduction to his thought, and I wish he had a good deal more available in the audio format.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Mr. P. D. Brocklehurst
  • Mr. P. D. Brocklehurst
  • 11-08-20

Utter drivell attempting to sound profound

I bought this book hoping that Wilber would somehow manage to present a more reasonable angle on the New Agers than the likes of Deep Quack Chopra & his ilk. To me Wilber's claims aren't quite as ludicrous as Chopra's but they aren't much better. He smuggles in an awful lot of unwarranted concepts & presents buzz words that amount to nothing more than 'word salad'. An example of this is him speaking of The Four Quadrants - an extremely notional concept he came up with which cannot be tested for authenticity in any reliable manner rending his idea *entirely* subjective.

Another bad habit of Wilber's is to misrepresent science. He pretends that science denies spirituality but it doesn't. It has nothing to say about it because even so-called 'spiritual' people can't even agree on things like their god / gods. Not even Christians, where Catholics think there's a '3 in 1' "Trinity" (whatever that could mean), Unitarians think there's only one God but Mormon think there are many! - And this is before any other faith claims are examined. If religions could make up their mind maybe scientist could address such claims but without wide agreement on such matters from the God Squad how can they agree OR disagree?

He makes a claim that evolution is an example of spirit 'returning to itself' by 'falling away' & returning but anyone who knows a thing of two about evolution will see that there's no good reason to believe any spirit has guided the processes we see, There are too many ludicrous examples of 'bad design' - giraffes like ourselves have a nerve called The Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve connecting their brain to their vocal cords which any intelligent designer would send from A to B - a matter of just a few inches, but is that what evolution created? No. It created a ludicrous detour all the way down it's neck & all the way back up again for no good reason making the nerve perhaps 30 or 40 times longer than it needs to be! Our eyes are also very badly 'designed' (not that there's any good reason to think that they are). Our retinas face in the wrong direction which in & of itself isn't too big a problem as they still detect light but out optic nerves have to go through a hole as a result of this which creates invisible blind spots the size of six full moons in each eye! The octopus doesn't have this design fault so why would this Great Spirit make such a stupid error as that? It wouldn't but mindless Natural Selection certainly would,

I could go on & on about how this book jumps to more & more unjustified conclusions & smuggles in unwarranted assumptions as if they were known facts but I'll stop or I'll be here all day. One thing I do acknowledge Wilber for is criticizing the Post Modernism for pretending there's no such thing as truth - which begs the question: 'Oh really but is that true?' - An ironic shortcoming he didn't miss so he does at least deserve one star in this review!