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Publisher's Summary

Reprint of a modern classic originally published in 1944 by Farrar & Rinehart, Inc. A classic tale of one man's struggle with alcoholism, this revolutionary novel remains Charles Jackson's best-known book - a daring autobiographical work that paved the way for contemporary addiction literature.

It is 1936, and on the East Side of Manhattan, a would-be writer named Don Birnam decides to have a drink. And then another, and then another, until he's in the midst of what becomes a five-day binge.

The Lost Weekend moves with unstoppable speed, propelled by a heartbreaking but unflinching truth. It catapulted Charles Jackson to fame, and endures as an acute study of the ravages of alcoholism, as well as an unforgettable parable of the condition of the modern man.

©1944, 1971 Charles R. Jackson, Rhoda Jackson (P)2014 Recorded Books

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Uncanny

Almost scary how accurate the experience is described from the stream of conscience.
THIS IS what its like.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Bill
  • Vancouver, WA, United States
  • 11-10-14

What a terrific audiobook!

If you could sum up The Lost Weekend in three words, what would they be?

Realistic, frightening, and compassionate.

What other book might you compare The Lost Weekend to and why?

No comparisons come to mind. If The Days of Wine and Roses was available as an audiobook maybe that would provide a pale comparison. I consider this to be the greatest work ever written about an alcoholic.

What does Donald Corren bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He nails it! He is the protagonist of the story. Flawlessly narrated.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, but too long and too intense for one sitting.

Any additional comments?

I was so excited when I saw this book finally available as an audiobook and for once it did not disappoint in the least. It surpassed my expectations and I will listen again soon. Thanks to Audible for an impeccable production of this masterpiece. I enjoyed every minute of it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Wonderful... and awfully true

I haven't even finished The Lost Weekend yet, but I am so moved that I have "a burming desire to share" right now. lol. There are many in recovery who know the origin of that statement, and if you don't, it doesn't matter. The point is this is an excellent peek in the mind of an addict. The million little daily conflicts that cause anxiety, the ridiculousness of one's own thoughts and schemes, the need to escape uncomfortable truths and the compulsion to get the next few hundred drinks or drugs. The feelings of shame and worthlessness, and the need to push the stupid feelings down again. The book has enough "awful" scenes of drunk behavior to titillate both the voyeur and the knowing addict, but for me, it's the churning of Jackson's mind that makes me nod and say "yes!" out loud, repeatedly. This is titled a fiction but it is really Jackson's life experiences. A non-addict could not come close to expressing what "we" think about. As a former drug user and equally frustrated writer, I have felt the self doubt and done the self sabotaging, over and over and over again. The passages where the hero, Don, has those monumental inspirations for his book, and then talks himself out of writing by poo-pooing his ideas are achingly familiar. In fact, I relate more to the dejected inertia of NOT writing than the descriptions of drinking. I am blessed with 8 years of clean time today. But it is always smart to remember being caught in that horrible, rollercoaster world of using, and the consequences that followed. Anyone who thinks this book is dated will be surprised at how relevant Jackson's words continue to be. It might hinge on being overly "cerebral" here and there, but alcoholics and addicts are frequently very smart people, and we are always in our heads! And that can be a dangerous place, in active addiction. Sadly, I know the author's addictions ended up costing him his life. That does not negate the poignancy of his journey. Well, as usual, the writer in me has overdone it. So, now, I eagerly return to this great book. Oh, and the narrator is also very good... very appropriate for this telling.

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Psychological thriller

Was cringeworthy to follow the exploits of the main character who is an alcoholic. I found myself very wrapped up in the story . The narrator is very very good. Great performance : dynamic , engaging , and did various voices well

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    5 out of 5 stars

Truer than true Alcoholism is timeless.

Weirdly even in an earlier era this author gets it so right. Time culture and experience transcends. He must have personal experience.