adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $23.09

Buy for $23.09

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Trying to get pregnant is enough to make any woman impatient. The Impatient Woman's Guide to Getting Pregnant is a complete guide to the medical, psychological, social, and sexual aspects of getting pregnant, told in a funny, compassionate way, like talking to a good friend who's been through it all. And in fact Dr. Jean Twenge has been through it all - the mother of three young children, she started researching fertility when trying to conceive for the first time.

A renowned sociologist, Dr. Twenge brought her research background to the information that she encountered online, from family and friends, and in books and decided to go into the latest studies to find out the real story. The good news is there is a lot less to worry about than you've been led to believe. Dr. Twenge gets to the heart of the emotional issues around getting pregnant, including how to prepare mentally and physically when thinking about conceiving; how to talk about it with family, friends, and your partner; and how to handle the great sadness of a miscarriage. Also covered is how to know when you're ovulating, when to have sex, timing your pregnancy, maximizing your chances of getting pregnant, how to tilt the odds toward having a boy or a girl, and the best prenatal diet.

©2012 Jean Twenge (P)2017 Tantor

What listeners say about The Impatient Woman's Guide to Getting Pregnant

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    160
  • 4 Stars
    39
  • 3 Stars
    18
  • 2 Stars
    9
  • 1 Stars
    5
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    130
  • 4 Stars
    35
  • 3 Stars
    20
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    4
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    131
  • 4 Stars
    32
  • 3 Stars
    13
  • 2 Stars
    9
  • 1 Stars
    7

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Better as a book

I love this book! Full of great facts and the list of references at the end definitely makes me feel like the author did her homework and can be trusted. The book is full of facts and figures, and after listening to about an hour I went and bought a hard copy instead. 1. So it would be easier to look up facts and figures at a fixture date and 2 so I could share with my husband.

I understand the author was trying to add a little humour into the mix, which did keep it on the lighter side of reading, but in doing so I found she made some large generalizations of the male population that I found bothersome at times. If we keep talking about how men do nothing around the house and need reminders to participate in our relationships with them, we put them at a different level and we're no longer equals and partners.

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great book that is very helpful.

I love that the author is realistic and is HUMAN. She explains why you might feel the way you do, she explains why things might happen, and she shares her own personal experiences (instead of a male doctor telling you its "normal to feel that way"). The absolute best parts of this book is that the author researches well known studies and finds that they are false or from the 17th century (far outdated for today's technology), and explains things in a way that a non-medical personale would be able to understand. I would recommend this book to everyone, including my close family and friends.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Good information, but pokes fun at men too much

I liked the book, and would read it again for the information it provides. The only thing that really irked me was a lot of sexism and jokes at men’s expense. My husband is an awesome fully developed human who is just as complex emotionally as anyone else. It felt pandering to “use sports statistics” to teach men fertility stats as just one example. These things were attempts at humor, but instead of making me laugh it just made me uncomfortable. Otherwise I really enjoyed the science statistics, and feel better informed about ttc now.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Too many male/female stereotypes and bad jokes

I really wanted to like this book but it was not the case.
1. There is some important information within the book, however, most of the data you could find by google-ing online, using a period app, or joining a TTC community.
2. The chapter on healthy eating wasn't really helpful as she is obviously someone who simplifies fertility dieting to just eating spinach, olives, and salmon.
3. The jokes actually get annoying very quickly
4. The book was written around 2012 but sounds like it was written in the 1940s. Women are stereotyped as "crazy" or "irrational" but she uses the word "impatient," as if wanting or planning a baby is a symptom of hysteria. Men are stereotyped like Homer Simpson: too stupid or not invested, other than just doing it when they aren't busy watching sports and scratching their crotch.
5. Doesn't consider single women wanting kids or gay/lesbian couples.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Feels like it was written in the 1950's

The author seems to either hate her husband or be so enmeshed in ancient and offensive gender stereotypes that it's hard to see through her delivery to the data.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Factual but sometimes opinionated and repetitive

The 1st several chapters are the strongest in the book. In the book. I largely enjoyed them and and took the information to heart.. Somewhere in the middle of the book, I found myself wondering where the author was going and started skipping chapters when I heard familiar lines. The last few chapters of the book are all appendicities. 2 of them I found so useful that I bookmarked for later. Most of them I found somewhat irrelevant. All in all, I found about half the book very informative. The other half of the book, I skipped entirely.

Sometimes the tone of the book made me chuckle. But especially towards the end of the book, it felt like the author was just taking pot-shots at men and conservative modern medical treatment. She could have handled more in a scientific tone and referred to more research, in my opinion. I found her opinions on C-Sections and IVF not only unnecessary, but potentially toxic, as we don't choose our lots in life, and could turn women away from avenues that are helpful to them.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Loaded with sexist tropes

For a book written by a contemporary psychologist and published in 2012, there are a startling number of sexist caricatures of men and women. Women are largely portrayed as manipulative and men as singularly motivated by sex. While there is some useful information, it's buried in such ridiculous drivel that this book is a hard pass. The e-book narration style also sucks.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Worth it

Very helpful! I became pregnant shortly after reading this book. Truly an impatient woman's dream!

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

An internalized misogyny flavored guide to conception

I was barely able to finish this book because of the of the overt misogyny. Men are described as being sports and sex obsessed, uninterested partners who shouldn’t be bothered with the details of trying to conceive. Women are are portrayed as motherhood obsessed, overly emotional dingbats who should keep their feelings and opinions to them selves or maybe a trusted friend. Some of the data and advice is good but the overall tone and aggressively gendered stereotypes makes it almost unreadable. There are better more feminist leaning books out there.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Extremely Distracting Sexist Humor

I will start with, the book does have some good info, if you have yet to do much research on conception. That being said, I am half-way through the book, and I just don’t think I have the stomach to finish it. The disgustingly sexist “jokes,” which lack any semblance of inclusivity that litter the book, just have me cringing, rolling my eyes, or just straight up having to put it down and walk away to take a break.

The author does NOT write in a professional manor, and speaks as if women need to be sneaky, manipulative succubi, in order to shield their unintelligible, sex-addicted, sports-fanatic, caveman of a partner (which they only refer to as husband) from the disgusting knowledge of *GASP* their cycles (also known as FAMILY planning). If you share absolutely no interests with your partner, and they are disgusted/uninterested by the science that goes into creating their child, I feel very sorry for you and your partner. They may also be too immature or not ready to have children, if that is the case.

TL;DR: If your idea of comedic gold is #BoomerHumor comics, then you’re in for a treat. If you have a healthy relationship, actually *like* your partner, and your relationship is not a 1950’s suburban sitcom, maybe look elsewhere for tips when TTC.