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Publisher's Summary

In this groundbreaking work, Kwame Anthony Appiah, hailed as "one of the most relevant philosophers today" (New York Times Book Review), changes the way we understand human behavior and the way social reform is brought about. In brilliantly arguing that new democratic movements over the last century have not been driven by legislation from above, Appiah explores the end of the duel in aristocratic England, the tumultuous struggles over foot binding in 19th-century China, the uprising of ordinary people against Atlantic slavery, and the horrors of "honor killing" in contemporary Pakistan. Intertwining philosophy and historical narrative, he has created "a fascinating study of moral evolution" (Philadelphia Inquirer) that demonstrates the critical role honor plays a in the struggle against man's inhumanity to man.

©2010 Kwame Anthony Appiah (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"[Appiah's] work reveals the heart and sensitivity of a novelist.... Fascinating, erudite and beautifully written." (The New York Times Book Review)

What listeners say about The Honor Code

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Horribly Boring

This is the worst book I have ever listened to on Audible and I have listen to quite a few! First of all it has nothing to do with moral revolutions. Secondly, the author who is also the narrator has the most boring, dead pan delivery I have ever heard! Do yourself a favor and skip this book!

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Contains content that can enhance one's understand

The definition of dignity as the respect due to everyone as human is a powerful example. I had difficulty putting this book down but 3 AM and life's responsibilities forced the necessity.

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An Important Topic which Could Use More Science

l think the topic of honor and its (positive and negative) effect on societies is very important and I enjoyed listening to the book very much.

At times, I would have wished the author concentrated a bit more on scientific studies around the topic and less on qualitative stories. The use cases described are interesting, however, it would have been even more interesting to learn more about what influenced the changes in the perception of what is honourable and what is not, over time. I wish there were more references to quantitative research on this topic.

All in all, an interesting 'read'!

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Best book I’ve read in a long time

I struggle to recall a better, or more noble and inspiring, read. And I read a lot. Thank you for this gem.

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A brilliant historical & intellectual exploration

The Author and Narrator fave a lecture at my local University and his depth of passion and intellect was as vivid in person as it was portrayed in this book. I've listened to it and each time journeyed, the clarity is as if he was standing before me again.