The God Virus

How Religion Infects Our Lives and Culture
Narrated by: Darrel Ray
Length: 7 hrs and 22 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (362 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

What makes religion so powerful? How does it weave its way into our political system? Why do people believe and follow obvious religious charlatans? What makes people profess deep faith even as they act in ways that betray that faith? What makes people blind to the irrationalities of their religion yet clearly see those of others? If these questions interest you, this book will give you the tools to understand religion and its power in you, your family and your culture.

For thousands of years, religion has woven its way through societies and people as if it were part and parcel to that society or person. In large measure it was left unexplained and unchallenged, it simply existed. Those who attempted to challenge and expose religion were often persecuted, excommunicated, shunned, or even executed. It could be fatal to explain that which the church, priest, or imam said was unexplainable. Before the germ, viral, and parasite theory of disease, physicians had no tools to understand disease and its propagation. Priests told people disease was a result of sin, Satan, evil spirits, etc.

With the discovery of microbial actors, scientists gained new tools to study how it spreads. They could study infection strategies, immunity, epidemiology and much more. Suddenly the terrible diseases of the past were understandable. The plagues of Europe, yellow fever, small pox, pneumonia, tuberculosis, syphilis, etc. were now removed from the divine and placed squarely in the natural world.

This book owes a great deal to Richard Dawkins' concept of viruses of the mind, but it seeks to go a step further to personalize the concept of religion as a virus and show how these revolutionary ideas work in everyday life. The paradigm can explain the fundamentalism of your Uncle Ned, the sexual behavior of a fallen megachurch minister, the child rearing practices of a Pentecostal neighbor, why 19 men flew planes into the World Trade Center, or what motivates a woman to blow herself up in the crowded markets of Baghdad. Learn how religion influences sexuality for its own purposes, how and why it protects pedofile priests and wayward ministers and how it uses survivor guilt to propagate and influence and how it might influence a person's IQ.

©2009 Darrel W. Ray, Ed.D. (P)2012 Darrel W. Ray, Ed.D.
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

A non-theist handbook

The book acts as an immunization against those who are infected with the religious virus. The author is never in your face and is mostly about giving the non-theist a way to think and understand the thinking behind the theist believers. I found this book a much better listen than Sam Harris' book, "The End of Faith". They cover similar material, but I found better arguments (through the metaphor of the virus) in this book.

The author even has a section on how to talk with religious people if you must (okay, the author doesn't say 'must', that's not his style at all). For example, if a believer says he'll be praying about you, just reply and say 'thanks, I'll be thinking about you". A non-confrontational approach which doesn't compromise your belief system is always preferable to pointless arguments.

The author reads his own book. He does a good job. He's not a great reader, but by having the author read his own book, I the listener get a better interpretation of the book.

10 people found this helpful

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A Viral Metaphor with Evidence

Would you consider the audio edition of The God Virus to be better than the print version?

I love the inflection from the author's voice. You can really tell where the important points that he wants to get across. Darrel does a great job.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The God Virus?

I enjoyed the giving of actual virus names and then showing how multiple religions act in that manner. I was able to learn about both at the same time. That was an unexpected benefit. I also enjoyed the characteristics of how religious people act, like the exorcist. I'll let you the listener find this one. It was so spot on!

What does Darrel Ray bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He really brings the different sections to life. It made me back up and hear certain parts more than once, because I loved the way it sounded.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, I wish I could have, but I had to do it in 3 sittings.

Any additional comments?

It was wonderfully produced and clear sounding. It even had nice soft music between chapters that was not annoying or too long like many other books. Great job here.

18 people found this helpful

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An Excellent, Intricate Analogy with Tangible Hope

Renowned psychologist Darrel Ray likens religion to a virus in this complex yet accessible tome. One of his first examples is the Toxoplasma Gandii parasite, which will override a mouse's instinctive fear of all things feline and seek out their natural enemy (the parasite can only reproduce inside cats). Likewise with the god virus, religion can cause humans to commit genetic suicide (think terrorist bombers, priests and nuns) in the service of their religion. The overreaching theme of the book is that religion (and those most heavily infected with the virus) do not care about their flock. All they care about is spreading their religion, and damn the consequences. As a fundamentalist Baptist for two decades, Ray is perfectly placed to examine and dissect the flawed arguments and effective tactics of religion. And, as a psychologist, he is able to give an objective, scientific illustration of why religions act in the way they do, how they have become so extravagantly successful, and what can be done to combat it.

Darrel Ray opens his book (written for non-believers) with a suggestion: talk to a Christian friend and ask their permission to record and/or transcribe the conversation. Ask them to explain their theistic beliefs in detail. Then, a few days or weeks later, repeat their statement of faith to them after replacing Jesus with Mohammed. The inescapable conclusion is that while religious individuals can see through the gimmicks and nonsensical arguments of every other religion (and schisms within their own, such as Mormonism). These schisms and inconsistent beliefs are not only powerful evidence against the truth of any one religion, but have also led to countless intra-faith and inter-faith conflicts throughout human history.

Chapter One details the spread of viruses in the natural world and through cultures. Viruses are spread by vectors (mosquitoes for malaria, priests, imams and rabbis for religion). Because of the enormous investment of time and money that training these individuals require, the virus will instinctively protect its vectors in the face of scandals. The recent surfeit of child rape atrocities in the Catholic church is a contemporary case study here. Religions will frequently use meaningless rituals to reinforce their beliefs in the mind of their believers. Why would Islam require five daily prayers (facing Mecca, no less) if their deity was actually real? Why the cultural and social practice of weekly sermons and proscriptions against masturbation in many religions? If it's good for the virus, it will spread and remain as long as it remains useful. They also tend to be very specific as to what constitutes "charity" (the ACLU typically doesn't qualify). Contradictions are rife, but the virus neuter's its host's capacity for critical thinking and reason (except where "heathen" faiths are concerned). Martyrs can be profitable "fruit" for sects, as was the case of Joseph Smith and Mormonism.

Chapter Two details religion's natural tendency for schisms and conflict. Sunnis and Shi'ites just can't seem to get along. Al Qaeda seems to loathe both groups equally. As an example, Iran has tried to keep fundamentalist Islam contained, but it continues to flare up violently on occasion. Religions can be grouped into three categories - parasitic, symbiotic and a hybrid of the two. All religions have some tangible benefits for their societies; they would not have survived very long without them. Jehovah's Witnesses can be very parasitic at times, especially since their dogma forbids blood transfusions. The harm that this can cause led to Russia clamping down on their religious practices to protect children and families from splitting apart.

Chapter Three begins with a description of early tribal religions and how it is the goal of most religions (at least in Europe and the US today) to seize control of the state (which will lead to further control as the two institutions become indistinguishable). Not only does this violate the protections of the US Constitution, but if successful, would threaten the religious freedom of every religion not in power. The myth of religious organisations doing more good than secular ones is smashed to smithereens here. Studies have shown that only around 5% of donations to churches and other religious institutions actually goes to benefit impoverished individuals (building wells, farming, education etc.). The vast majority is wasted on bibles (unless you're a goat), preaching, church buildings and instilling religious rituals and teachings, which have no benefit here on Earth.

By stark contrast, Oxfam, Doctors Without Borders and other charities motivated by a desire to reduce suffering spend close to 80% on directly helping communities, with most of the remainder on administrative costs. No plush, extravagant mansions for these altruists.

Chapter Four deals with repressive sexual teachings, and how they can instill individuals with guilt (which is covered in detail later) for normal desires such as masturbating and fantasising about attractive adults. The contradictory messages of religion are shown here, and are so transparent all but the most brainwashed (or willfully ignorant) can and will see them. Misogyny and emotional blackmail are also rife.

I would go through the chapters individually, but I'm already starting to ramble. It is safe to say that scientific education is the best vaccine we have against theism, as showcased in Japan and Europe, where creationism has been held at bay, more or less. When dealing with the infected, be polite and do not ridicule their beliefs. Notice when they have put up a wall or are unwilling to discuss certain subjects. This will often be in a different tone, glance or personality. When dealing with grief, be tactful, and put your own skepticism aside to comfort them. If they need a priest or rabbi at their deathbed, arrange for it. Compassion is crucial in such situations. Honesty is once again the best policy; do not indicate that you might be interested in converting (unless, of course, you actually are).

The myth of objective religious morality is exposed as a fraud and a sham. Not only do evangelical Christians divorce more frequently than atheists and agnostics, but their own preachers, held up as paragons of virtue, often and even when they fall (Satan must really be going after them since he's doing such a good job of winning souls for Christ). Furthermore, even such things as the definition of "murder" have changed through history. In Old Testament times, certainly, it was not murder to beat your slave so badly that he or she died after a few sunsets. Black lynchings were accepted in racist portions of America in past decades. As Matt Dillahunty eloquently put it, religion has been dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century. Enlightenment ideals led to more humans laws and compassionate societies, not religious edicts that cannot be empirically verified and must be taken on faith.

This book is a must-read for anyone incredulous or concerned at religion's pernicious and near-ubiquitous influence in modern society.

8 people found this helpful

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Fascinating topic, and yet...

It is possible that the author has a sharp scientific mind. He acknowledges that this work expands on ideas put forth by Dawkins and Dennett. As a formerly trying-to-be-religious person raised by fundamentalists I can say anecdotally that the comparison of religion to virus has merit. In this book the hypothesis was presented more as a metaphor; I expected it to be more science-based than it was. The author uses sciency language, but without meaty philosophical or scientific treatment the idea is reduced to hours and hours of "it spreads...just like virus," "it affects decision-making...just like a virus."

6 people found this helpful

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Great way to look at the religion problem.

Loved this book. Listened to it in two days, couldn't put it down. It allows one to look at religion and the infected religious folks out there in a new way. Highly recommended.

1 person found this helpful

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Very interesting!

Where does The God Virus rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This is a very interesting concept about the inception and present proliferation of religion on the world's population. This book has been very interesting and I just wanted to listen every waking minute.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The God Virus?

Comparing my own background in religion with the authors. I thought I was agnostic, but after listening to this book, I would have to say that I am more atheist.

Have you listened to any of Darrel Ray’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have not listened to this author before

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes

Any additional comments?

Very interesting theory about how God is a virus. So true!! This audio book is worth listening to more than once.

1 person found this helpful

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love it

Dr Ray is amazing and his books changed my life. check out his other book sex and God.

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Glad I got this one

Some kind of irony, I had it sitting in my library and just remembered it. As of now the covid-19 virus is going about and preacher's and the like (#notall) are @ thier game.

That aside, this book is accurate and insightful in its depictions of the state of how the god belief functions and suggestions on how to move forward.

For some it may be redundant, besides that and a few audible hiccups, I'm really glad I got this one.

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Great information. Lacks solutions.

I really enjoyed the information presented in this book. I do wish however, there were more solutions For those who have been infected with the "God virus" and are trying to heal. I do recommend reading the book though overall.

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Great book

Very informative and easy to understand. I am an atheist. I gained great insight from this book.

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  • Ms. S. Iliffe
  • 04-09-13

A different approach to the case for atheism

I found this book very engaging and interesting. Rather than focus on the texts of different religions as many books putting the atheist case do, this book looks at the way religion acts on individuals and on societies. The case is well put together and the author humanises it with real life examples. The author narrates the book himself, which can sometimes be problematic. It works in this case though, as you can hear his conviction and thoughtfulness in his narration and he has a narration style that is conversational and easy to listen to. Definitely recommend.

4 people found this helpful

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  • Ron
  • 08-04-15

a book everyone should read

it is a shame about the recording. at points it is painfully loud others it can barely be heard, at times recorded in a bathroom others in a padded room. and the gap between chapters is ridiculous. but the content and message is right on point. audible? please rerecord this with a professional reader and editor. the book is too important

1 person found this helpful