adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $9.07

Buy for $9.07

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

The Big Bow Mystery is a masterpiece of the form, as compelling a story today as when it was first published. The author has produced a seminal crime novel - the original "locked room" mystery.

With a flair for storytelling and a literate style comparable to his contemporary, Charles Dickens, Israel Zangwill concocts a heady satire of Victorian England, setting his scene in London's picturesque Bow district. His hero is the colorful retired police inspector Grodman, whose egotism and brilliance bear striking resemblance to that most famous 19th century fictional sleuth - Sherlock Holmes.

Public Domain (P)1982 Jimcin Recordings

What listeners say about The Big Bow Mystery

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    11
  • 4 Stars
    11
  • 3 Stars
    14
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    2
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    8
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    3
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    10
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    8
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 01-12-21

A Tedious Little Story and Dreadful Narrator

This is a classic of Crime fiction, by virtue of its being possibly the first real locked-room mystery. Published in 1892, it shows its Victorian origins, in a great deal of long wordy speechifying; this is tedious in an audiobook, and although there is a clever twist at the end, the fundamental concept is callous and extremely dislikable.
As to the narrator, this is a London story, the descriptions and atmosphere of London of that period permeate the book, so whatever possessed the producer to provide a narrator with an American accent? It jars and distracts throughout and is totally inappropriate.
To sum up, a tedious and unpleasant little story that should have been left in the annals of Crime Fiction History, is unsuited to an audiobook, and certainly not in an American voice.