• The Attachment Parenting Book

  • A Commonsense Guide to Understanding and Nurturing Your Child
  • By: William Sears MD, Martha Sears RN
  • Narrated by: Jim Denison
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (141 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

America's foremost baby and childcare experts, William Sears, MD, and Martha Sears, RN, explain the benefits - to both you and your child - of connecting with your baby early.

Might you and your baby both sleep better if you shared a bed? How old is too old for breastfeeding? What is a father's role in nurturing a newborn? How does early attachment foster a child's eventual independence? Dr. Bill and Martha Sears - the doctor-and-nurse, husband-and-wife team who coined the term "attachment parenting" - answer these and many more questions in this practical, inspiring guide. Attachment parenting is a style of parenting that encourages a strong early attachment and advocates parental responsiveness to babies' dependency needs.

The Attachment Parenting Book clearly explains the seven "Baby Bs" that form the basis of this popular parenting style:

  • Bonding
  • Breastfeeding
  • Babywearing
  • Belief in the language value of baby's cry
  • Bedding close to baby
  • Balance
  • Beware of baby trainers

Here's all the information you need to achieve your most important goals as a new parent: to know your child, to help your child feel right, and to enjoy parenting.

©2001 William Sears and Martha Sears (P)2019 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about The Attachment Parenting Book

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Unscientific, somewhat sexist

Some of the advice in this book was good, but there is little real evidence for anything in the book. The author has some sexist views about women's roles, as well as offhand comments about what women like that are basically just gender stereotypes (e.g., "make sure you do things you like sometimes, like get a manicure").

1 person found this helpful

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Very helpful and reassuring

This book is a great resource for anyone interested in gentle, respectful parenting that works. I recommend reading before baby arrives if possible!

1 person found this helpful

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There are better parenting books

If you’re reading up on parenting books, you’ll learn nothing new in this one and but you’ll get plenty of sweeping generalizations. Sweet Sleep by La Leche League is by far and away better, which is referenced in this book. Btw, this is written from the dad’s perspective. He says “baby” throughout the book without any real differentiation in age. There are obviously different developmental appropriate practices when it comes to feeding/sleeping with a 5 week old versus a 10 month, for example. Again, it’s all very general when it comes to his theory developed out of his experience of raising 8 kids.

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Condescending more than enlightening

Interested in the idea over all but this is more preaching rather than informative. The Narration choice does not help. I'll be finding other books that don't sound like it's giving me permission to call myself a mom IF I follow it.

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cannot listen to it

the amount of times this person says attachment parenting is driving me crazy and I have just heard a bit of the book! also, many things he's saying don't make sense to me

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Wish I had this book when I was pregnant

It is like a cheat sheet for the parent that doesn’t know what kind of help to ask for. Many things my husband and I instinctively do but it’s great to have the supporting arguments that we are doing the best thing for our child. I even encouraged all my mommy friends to listen or read this book

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Well read & well written

I appreciated the narration; good flow and the vibe was fine.
The organization of chapters made it easy to navigate topics. It was well rounded and I feel I understand much more about attachment parenting now. I will pursue more publications by this author.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 09-09-22

Repetitive

It was long and meandering, useful information but much longer than it needed to be.

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  • Patrick B.
  • 07-13-22

Some good advice but….

The narrator sounds like some 90s American infomercial / anchor parody and puts some sauce on certain sentences that sound so condescending. Which I would of forgiven if this was recorded when the book came out in 2001 but wasn’t, it’s 2019.

This books has some good advice but they definitely come from a place of privilege saying get some help in to help clean and child minders my single mother on a council estate would have felt very excluded from a lot of this advice which makes me sad as it could have been worded differently in parts to not make people not in there financial position feel like they are can’t cope without money or a husband to help out. Very nuclear family oriented and a some very Christian values/messages like using commandments for do and don’ts that was very off putting also the caribbean accents felt very cringe inducing.

I’m down with most of what is said in the book just a few parts and aspects left a bad taste in my mouth.

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  • Erika
  • 01-26-22

a bible of modern parenting.

great format to listen to with my baby in a sling.:-) wish o listened to it earlier.
Dr Sears pioneered co sleeping and importance of breastfeeding and keeping baby close by.

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  • Kristina
  • 12-07-21

Life Changing!

I enjoyed this book very much. I have been doing all of the Bs naturally but it as comforting to listen that it all makes sense. Wish I had read it earlier.

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  • Gemma Freeman
  • 05-30-22

Outdated parental expectations

This book has some good principles on attachment. However it feels exceptionally outdated in terms of its gender roles. Firstly, I felt uncomfortable having a male author and reader telling me what I should do when it comes to breastfeeding etc. Secondly, it puts all of the onus on the mother, including the responsibility to keep her husband happy. It does encourage fathers to be more involved, but says that it is the mother’s responsibility to directly ask them, and that father’s should ask a mother what needs doing. I think as a society we are aware that both parents need to take responsibility and initiative now, and this full mental load doesn’t need to fall on a mother!
It also feels a little bit repetitive.

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  • Yaz
  • 04-05-21

Explains scientific and sensitive approach

I enjoyed the balance of an evidence based and personal approach to caring for babies using the principles of attachment theory.
it helped me feel more confident that the approach I wanted to take is the right one, being a first time single mum from a very dysfunctional family, it's critical for me to do things differently to raise my baby.
Only downside was the audio, the presenter has a very mechanical sounding voice which I didn't like.