• Thalia Book Club: Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

  • By: Marilynne Robinson
  • Narrated by: James Wood
  • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
  • 4.1 out of 5 stars (19 ratings)
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Publisher's Summary

Marilynne Robinson discusses her Pulitzer Prize-winning and New York Times best-selling second novel, the lyrical, luminous, unforgettable story of minister John Ames, as told poetically in a long letter to his young son. His powerful story spans three generations from the Civil War to the twentieth century. This is a book that is being passed hand to hand and that booksellers nationwide are recommending.
If you haven't heard it already, download Marilynne Robinson's Gilead (Unabridged).

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©2005 The Symphony Space, Inc. (P)2005 The Symphony Space, Inc.

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  • Kremer
  • 07-17-18

Disappointing

A rather inept and unrevealing interview with a great writer. It gets a bit better when questions are opened to the floor. But even then, they barely discuss the book in question.