Technopoly

The Surrender of Culture to Technology
Narrated by: Jeff Riggenbach
Length: 5 hrs and 39 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (150 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

In this witty, often terrifying work of cultural criticism, Postman chronicles our transformation into a Technopoly: a society that no longer merely uses technology as a support system but instead is shaped by it. According to Postman, technology is rapidly gaining sovereignty over social institutions and national life to become self-justifying, self-perpetuating, and omnipresent. He warns that this will have radical consequences for the meanings of politics, art, religion, family, education, privacy, intelligence, and truth, as they are redefined to fit the requirements of the technological thought-world.

©1992 Neil Postman (P)2000 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about Technopoly

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Error in recording

With 10:48 left in chapter 4, there is a jump that is clearly an error. Two unrelated thoughts get connected across the break. This needs a fix.

9 people found this helpful

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Indispensable

This is indispensable to philosophy of science and/or technology. Postman is more relevant now than ever.

3 people found this helpful

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Great read (listen)

Reading this book was insightful... Considering the book was published in 1992 the contents are relevant in 2015.

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wonderful book

I just followed on John Cheese's lead.

it hasn't failed me!

thank You, Mr Cleese!

1 person found this helpful

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As a technologist, this book is a lighthouse.

Today, so much is without any meaning except more, more, more. Why we create technology is completely left out, along with its place in life. Craving real culture, we destroy more of it every day. This book crushes the premise of technology as an end in itself, and especially charges structures which undermine humanity. The solution at the end is appropriate and exciting. And the book itself is prescient in measurable ways. I'm grateful beyond words for this work. And now, we regroup around actual value, not efficiency alone.

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the narrator was very fast and robotic

The narrator lacked human emotion in my opinion, but the content of the book was well worth the read. this book is a great proposal of how humanity has been led astray and what to do to fix it. very eye opening, and a well needed read.

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Gives You chills

This book is absolutely captivating from start to finish. I rate it five stars but I am blind and the app will not let me. Neil Postman traces the history of societies and how they biew their tools, which he states are in fact always forms of technology. in fact, he argues that science in and of itself is in fact a technology. Postman proceeds to demonstrate forthwith our idolatry of and enslavement to technology. This book was written at a time in which the World Wide Web did not even exist, and any reference to the Internet would have called it Ciberspace. The conclusion of the book is quite uplifting as Postman implores us not to allow precious things such as religion, the telling of stories, and relationships themselves to slip away. #TechAddiction #Creepy #whitty #Troubling #Inspiring #Enthralling #TagsGiving #SweepStakes

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always a pleasure to read Neil postman

great, not as good as amusing ourselves to death, but always outside the box! Niel postman is a great thinker!

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Eye Opening

This is an astounding and well thought out description of how technology simulates human progress. It delves into topics that I have been thinking about for years.

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A manual for American culture

I know it's not easy to look our own cultural assumptions in the face, but this book should be essential reading for every literate American.

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  • Mr. J. Lonsdale
  • 06-14-20

interesting book, horrible narration.

Unfortunately I was unable to tolerate the narration - robotic, too fast and with no feeling for the subject. Its almost like a robot is reading it.

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  • DB
  • 01-20-18

Must read!

You have to read/hear this (and Oliver James' The Selfish Capitalist Origins of Affluenza) to properly understand (and be able to articulate) what it is about our modern world that is making us so ignorant, controllable, and unhappy.