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Publisher's Summary

Many objects have been found from the deep past which should not exist. We are talking about millions to hundreds of millions years ago.

The objects described in this book provide lots of evidence that they really originated in those ages. These things include metal containers and vases found in seams of coal, and spark plugs encased in rock which should not exist.

There are also ancient footprints of giants which were created before land animals are believed to have existed.

This information along with that from my previous books on ancient civilizations leads to the startling conclusion that an ancient race of giants existed in the distant past.

Learn more about what these objects are and how they all tie together to create a vision of an amazing past of civilization on Earth.

©2019 Martin K. Ettington (P)2020 Martin K. Ettington

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Terrible

This is the lowest-quality audiobook I’ve ever heard. The sound quality suggests the author (who doubles as the voice actor) used novice equipment to make his recording. He goes so far as to state things by page, such as “the ISBN.” Additionally, he constantly makes major pronunciation errors. His accent is not from a region that would suggest, for example, that “lava” is pronounced “laaaaa vuh,” for example.

Content further hurts this title. The author brings up interesting points but inconsistently provides counter arguments (to the point in which I simply turned it off). I’m returning it now.