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Song Yet Sung  By  cover art

Song Yet Sung

By: James McBride
Narrated by: Leslie Uggams
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Publisher's summary

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Good Lord Bird, winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction, Deacon King Kong, Five-Carat Soul, and Kill 'Em and Leave

In the days before the Civil War, a runaway slave named Liz Spocott breaks free from her captors and escapes into the labyrinthine swamps of Maryland’s eastern shore, setting loose a drama of violence and hope among slave catchers, plantation owners, watermen, runaway slaves, and free blacks. Liz is near death, wracked by disturbing visions of the future, and armed with “the Code,” a fiercely guarded cryptic means of communication for slaves on the run. Liz’s flight and her dreams of tomorrow will thrust all those near her toward a mysterious, redemptive fate.

Filled with rich, true details—much of the story is drawn from historical events—and told in McBride’s signature lyrical style, Song Yet Sung is a story of tragic triumph, violent decisions, and unexpected kindness.

©2008 James McBride (P)2008 Penguin

Critic reviews

"McBride...can deliver the cauterizing power of anger without the corrosive effects of bitterness.... It just might turn out to be balm for a wound that has so far stubbornly refused to heal." (The New York Times)

"Gripping, affecting, and beautifully paced, Song Yet Sung illuminates, in the most dramatic fashion, a deeply troubled, vastly complicated moment in American history." (O, The Oprah Magazine)

"Powerful...A complex, ever-tightening, increasingly suspenseful web." (The Washington Post Book World)