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Publisher's Summary

The sequel to the New York Times best-seller Every Day, now a major motion picture starring Angourie Rice. 

Every day a new body. Every day a new life. Every day a new choice. 

For as long as A can remember, life has meant waking up in a different person's body every day, forced to live as that person until the day ended. A always thought there wasn't anyone else who had a life like this.  

But A was wrong. There are others.  

A has already been wrestling with powerful feelings of love and loneliness. Now comes an understanding of the extremes that love and loneliness can lead to - and what it's like to discover you are not alone in the world.  

In Someday, David Levithan takes listeners further into the lives of A, Rhiannon, Nathan, and the person they may think they know as Reverend Poole, exploring more deeply the questions at the core of Every Day and Another Day: What is a soul? And what makes us human?   

©2018 David Levithan (P)2018 Listening Library

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Good, but very slow pacing

So, I'm a bit conflicted with my ratings, for a few reasons, specifically the overall and the story, the audio narration performance his hands down great. I normally don't give such low story ratings, but the main issue I have with this book/ series is that the author set up the central cliffhanger in the end of the 1st book, and he makes it sound like the main character is doing what he is doing to get the answers from the main bad guy, and although it was interesting to hear the same events from the other perspective in book 2, it seemed like largely a delay tactic, to stretch it out as long as possible. This was confirmed, when this book started, and we don't get the conversation that we been expecting until the last 1/5th of the book. The author does lead up to it, and sets it up well, and it is largely fulfilling, but I can't help but think there must have been a quicker way to get to this point.

I know this kind of topic is largely unexplored, beyond the old conventional means, which is one of the reasons I like this series so much. However, usually when you tell a story, it's best to get to the point as soon as possible. A great example, is in an interview with JJ Abrims about the show Revolution. He says when they were crafting the core narrative, as to why the power went out world wide, he asked if there is any real reason why the characters who knew what happened and how, would not tell people. and he realized, no. So he made the decision to explain tings early, instead of dangling the question for a long time, which is what this author has done. Sure, it's important to keep people hooked, and sure you want them to keep coming back, but at points in this series, and especially this book, it felt like he was purposefully dragging his feet. This series is my 1st exposure to this author, so I don't know if this is a series thing, or a systematic thing.

I get it, it's important to set up characters, so you can find out who they are, and how they want to be seen and all that, and the author does a good job with showing each character, and yes, even though a lot feels more like filler, it is still tasty filler. The point in proper design no matter what your designer, form story, to art, to mechanical things, etc. is to be strategic, and most of this book, is somewhat strategic in the character stories, but as said, other times it feels like the author is hammering a previous point in again, maybe not overly so, but it is there.

The most interesting chapters for me were X, seeing things from his perspective did definitely help lay the foundations for the conversations near the end of the book. His 1st chapter was really good, but I can't help but think, that given X can stay longer, his central goal could have been taken care of with his 1st body. In my mind, that might have also shown a bit more about him, and it would have been a cleaner break, since this guy's family wouldn't know he wasn't at school, and he could just disappear. I get the purpose of Xs last body, and why he liked it, but there were more attachments. Anyways.

I get the point of keeping A a blank slate in some aspects, so the reader can project themselves, but the author is running the risk of making A a bit too like the stereotypical liberal ideal of a person who doesn't identify as as male or female, who doesn't have preferences to body type, who never uses any sexuality terms, such as gay or strait for himself, who thinks deeply about everyone's social economic status. It makes sense, A is only 16 or so, while X seems like he's at least 30., likely older. And in a way it's pure and fascinating, not subscribing to societal norms of how people should be. But this can also bee seen as the ignorance of youth. Or as I said, some sort of liberal ideal. Don't get me wrong, I like A, and I like how he seems things, depicting pure ideals are one of the only ways that can inspire people to work twprds and active those ideals.
I really hope we don't have to wait years for the next installment. The issues around identity that this seines deals with are indeed hard issues, and very relevant for our times, and I commend the author for coming up with such a good technique to explore these issues. And for some reason. I've always had this interest in the concept of biddy swamping.The great thing about this series, is it treats the issue in a different way than I've ever seen before.

honestly, I'd would have given this all 5s if the author had just taken a more direct path to where he was going, and giivng us more theories and explanation as to why they body hop. But I can see the mechanics of that as a very difficult line to walk, if you get to religious, you alienate. if you get too scientific the same thing, I also understand why As 16, and why X sounds way older. It's easier to write and identify with someone so young, not just because they are coming into their own, but any older, a lot of these biases and preferences, and educational and career interests, and hobbies get locked down.

A could be anyone that young, and that is what makes him relocatable, no matter how old you are. Another thought that came to mind, is this seems like it's at base a pG 13 series, or with that in mind. X, and some of the others could have sworn at a few times, but they didn't.

Another thing that is touched on, but not fully explored is the potential of online communications and relationships, we do get to explore it a bit with the other traveler's in this book, but there is so much more that can be explored, and so many ways to make sure you stay in communication with people. As simple example is social media, which is explored, but if these traveler's really wanted to know how their presence effects the people they ride, they can just take note of their name, and information, and look them up, track them down, and talk to them. They could do this over and over again, if they really wanted to, and being different people, asking questions from different angles.

They could also keep things and records and stuff in secret places, or under different names, or anonymously.

If you want something bad enough, eventually you will find a way. It may not turn out how you imagine, and it might be harder and take longer than others, but I believe where there's a will, there is a way. (sometimes that means waiting around until technology catches up) But ya.

Almost goes without saying, but this is a great series for understanding LGBT people, especially trans, which is one of the main points, obviously.

This is probably TLDR for most, so in short:
Love this series, good book, Great performance, slow story.
A is almost like a liberal ideal.
Hope we don't need to wait for years for the next installment
Hope we explore more of life's big questions, beyond just identity.
Great for LGBT+ perspectives.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • whoa!
  • North Carolinaa
  • 10-27-18

It’s okay

I’m not sure where to begin, honestly. I enjoyed the first book quite a lot. I even liked Another Day, but for some reason this book didn’t feel “right” to me. I finished the book despite that. At the end, I was left feeling “that was it? That’s how it ends? This is the closure?”
Without giving away any spoilers, this book does dive a little more into the lives of people like “A”
But not enough to really care about. You get glimpses of random peoples lives inserted randomly into the narrative, and then it’s over. I found it to be a bit distracting sometimes. There’s like a 5 minute prayer from some random lady, and by the time it was over, I was just *over* it. I’m sure this was to show you certain aspects of the lives of people like A. Like what happens when _____ or they can actually ____ (not spoiling) but you’ll see. But I sometimes got the feeling that “A’s” story wasn’t focused on enough because of all these random clips. To me it felt like it was a Nathan story and Rhiannon story, sprinkled with
Some “A”
Overall, I guess it’s closure enough to the series. I was left feeling this was a final book. I still have questions... but enough answers were provided to wrap it up.

To sum it up:
It was good enough. That is how I feel.