Smart People Should Build Things

How to Restore Our Culture of Achievement, Build a Path for Entrepreneurs, and Create New Jobs in America
Narrated by: Tim Paige
Length: 6 hrs and 12 mins
Categories: Business, Career Skills
4 out of 5 stars (103 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Andrew Yang, the founder of Venture for America, offers a unique solution to our country's economic and social problems - our smart people should be building things. Smart People Should Build Things offers a stark picture of the current culture and a revolutionary model that will redirect a generation of ambitious young people to the critical job of innovating and building new businesses.

As the Founder and CEO of Venture for America, Andrew Yang places top college graduates in start-ups for two years in emerging US cities to generate job growth and train the next generation of entrepreneurs. He knows firsthand how our current view of education is broken. Many college graduates aspire to finance, consulting, law school, grad school, or medical school out of a vague desire for additional status and progress rather than from a genuine passion or fit.

In Smart People Should Build Things, this self-described "recovering lawyer" and entrepreneur weaves together a compelling narrative of success stories (including his own), offering observations about the flow of talent in the United States and explanations of why current trends are leading to economic distress and cultural decline. He also presents recommendations for both policy makers and job seekers to make entrepreneurship more realistic and achievable.

©2014 Andrew Yang (P)2019 Tantor

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Important

A should-read for smart kids and their parents. A little late and irrelevant for the rest of us 😟

2 people found this helpful

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Incredibly Detailed

Can't say I've ever heard someone so elequently and effectively detail what's happening to the economy and work force. It's down to earth and does not makes your eyes (or ears) glaze over. This is a must listen.

5 people found this helpful

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Great insight / perspective on America job growth

I liked how Andrew Yang critically assessed where and how America’s best young talent is getting funneled — mainly into financial services. His account of his early entrepreneurial efforts is an interesting story of resilience and grit — an the realities of entrepreneurship. I appreciated his acknowledgment of the fact that those who do not have a financial safety net or an affluent network of colleagues are less able to initiate a new startup effort. For such people, I would encourage consideration of the opportunity to bring such startup approaches to large organizations — including non profits and government. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to gain a better understanding of how our university culture shapes employment decisions of graduating students — and is interesting in helping to reshape current trends towards more value-creation activities that solve real problems and drive job growth.

5 people found this helpful

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Smart doesn’t mean smart.

In Yang’s other book The War on Normal People, he describes what he means by “normal people” because it wasn’t quite what it sounds like. The same thing happens here. I wished “smart people” had been defined because it ultimately ended up being intelligent people that also came from money and opportunity. I kept waiting for him to talk about intelligent “normal people” but we never got there...

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#YangGang

This book is everything I wish I had access to while I was away at school. #YangGang

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Nothing personal, MR. Yang, but...

This book is as hollow as a drugstore chocolate Easter Bunny. The most vapid and vacuous recitation of what must have been your personal— and meticulously detailed— diary.

Not an atom of content worth absorbing.

I’m sure you are a good person but writing— like political aspiration— is not in your lane.

Smart People should avoid this at all costs.

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I was expecting more

This one seemed to be a big advertisement for Venture For America, not what I was looking for.

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Yang gang

Andrew Yang is has the right vision for America! We need a leader that we can trust and guide us.

As a small business owner for 12 years employing 20 young adults both part time and full time. The information in this book is exactly what we need for young entrepreneurs.

If you are a student or a business owner this is a great book! Not a must read but a it will open your eyes to how today’s young minds are undervalued and wasted due to poor systems.

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Finally on audible

I have been wanting to listen to this book for so long. It was worth the wait. My only criticism is I would have loved to have hear this read by Andrew Yang. I understand that he has more important things to focus on at the moment. This book is an example of how he has been working towards a better future for America long before he ever decided to run for president.