Sample
  • Six Armies in Tennessee

  • The Chickamauga and Chattanooga Campaigns
  • By: Steven E. Woodworth
  • Narrated by: Bill Nevitt
  • Length: 10 hrs and 27 mins
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (89 ratings)

Prime logo Prime members: New to Audible?
Get 2 free audiobooks during trial.
Pick 1 audiobook a month from our unmatched collection.
Listen all you want to thousands of included audiobooks, Originals, and podcasts.
Access exclusive sales and deals.
Premium Plus auto-renews for $14.95/mo after 30 days. Cancel anytime.
Six Armies in Tennessee  By  cover art

Six Armies in Tennessee

By: Steven E. Woodworth
Narrated by: Bill Nevitt
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $24.95

Buy for $24.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.
activate_primeday_promo_in_buybox_DT

Publisher's summary

When Vicksburg fell to Union forces under General Grant in July 1863, the balance turned against the Confederacy in the trans-Appalachian theater. The Federal success along the river opened the way for advances into central and eastern Tennessee, which culminated in the bloody battle of Chickamauga and then a struggle for Chattanooga. Chickamauga is usually counted as a Confederate victory, albeit a costly one. That battle - indeed the entire campaign - is marked by muddle and blunders occasionally relieved by strokes of brilliant generalship and high courage. The campaign ended significant Confederate presence in Tennessee and left the Union poised to advance upon Atlanta and the Confederacy on the brink of defeat in the western theater.

©1998 University of Nebraska Press (P)2017 Redwood Audiobooks
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

Critic reviews

"A fine analysis of strategic and tactical operations, stressing the influence of commanders on the success, or failure, of their armies." ( Kirkus)
"Concise and easily read... enables the reader to grasp the full significance of the whole campaign." ( Chattanooga Free Press)