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Publisher's Summary

What is it like to be a dog? A bat? Or a dolphin? To find out, neuroscientist Gregory Berns and his team began with a radical step: they taught dogs to go into an MRI scanner - completely awake. They discovered what makes dogs individuals with varying capacities for self-control, different value systems, and a complex understanding of human speech. And dogs were just the beginning.

In What It's Like to Be a Dog, Berns explores the fascinating inner lives of wild animals from dolphins and sea lions to the extinct Tasmanian tiger. Much as Silent Spring transformed how we thought about the environment, so What It's Like to Be a Dog will fundamentally reshape how we think about - and treat - animals. Groundbreaking and deeply humane, it is essential listening for animal lovers of all stripes.

©2017 Gregory Berns (P)2017 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"An impressive overview of modern neurology and the still-unanswered issues raised by our treatment of our fellow living creatures." (Kirkus)

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Raise consciousness about animal consciousness!

Gregory Berns has a special place in my heart due to all of his work showing how magnificent the minds of dogs are. In this book he shares research into the conscious minds of other animals, too, encouraging readers to consider the thought processes animals are capable of.

I can't give the performance 5 stars because Mr. Hempel kept saying "att-RIBUTES" when it seemed to me the sentence called for "ATT-ributes."