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Publisher's Summary

Greg Bear's fiction ingeniously combines cutting-edge science and unforgettable characters. It has won multiple Hugo and Nebula Awards and choruses of critical acclaim. Now, with Darwin's Radio, Bear creates a nonstop thriller swirling with provocative ideas about the next step of human evolution.

In a cave high in the Alps, a renegade anthropologist discovers a frozen Neanderthal couple with a Homo sapiens baby. Meanwhile, in southern Russia, the U.N. investigation of a mysterious mass grave is cut short. One of the investigators, molecular biologist Kaye Lang, returns home to the U.S. to learn that her theory on human retroviruses has been verified with the discovery of SHEVA, a virus that has slept in our DNA for millions of years and is now waking up. How are these seemingly disparate events connected? Kaye Lang and her colleagues must race against a genetic time bomb to find out.

Darwin's Radio pulses with intelligent speculation, international adventure, and political intrigue as it explores timeless human themes. George Guidall's masterful performance heightens the excitement and keeps you enthralled until the final fascinating word.

©2000 Greg Bear; (P)2000 Recorded Books

Critic Reviews

  • Winner, 2000 Nebula Award - Best Novel

"Centered on well-developed, highly believable figures who are working scientists and full-fledged human beings, this fine novel is sure to please anyone who appreciates literate, state-of-the-art SF." (Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.7 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    249
  • 4 Stars
    313
  • 3 Stars
    243
  • 2 Stars
    72
  • 1 Stars
    40

Performance

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    195
  • 4 Stars
    194
  • 3 Stars
    105
  • 2 Stars
    20
  • 1 Stars
    10

Story

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    160
  • 4 Stars
    168
  • 3 Stars
    135
  • 2 Stars
    38
  • 1 Stars
    27
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  • Overall

Save Your Money

The author clearly lost his way about midway through this book. I don't know if he lost interest or decided to change direction but it was obvious and ruined the story. No more Greg Bear for me!

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Luis
  • Miami, Fl, United States
  • 02-24-08

Liked the beginning

I liked the book until about the last 3rd after that it was not as believable or interesting. I did not like he end.

4 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Steven
  • prescott, AZ, United States
  • 11-29-07

ok not great

A severe suspension of disbelief is needed for this story in general. Seems like a background fiction for the so called indigo children discussed on late nite talk radio. The ability of human DNA to modify itself and anticipate changes, world events, etc. is the main problem I have with the premise.

3 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

It's worth it for the birth scene

I don't know how a man wrote such an amazing section on child birth, but it's absolutely gripping.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

D'ont even start it.

Marvelous until the last few chapters. There is no resolution,but more of the same, characters going from place to place forever. The author has the government "stealing' these kids as if they were criminals. not realistic given the rest of the plot.

3 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • JCS
  • Seattle
  • 11-16-09

Go back!

Unless you want to learn about microbiology (how much is real and how much fiction?), this book is a SNOOZER. It reads like he just wanted to show off his new-found knowledge and and attmpted to wrap it up in a LAME story. There is no plot, no suspense, no twists, nothing. It's a straight line, completely predictable boring book. The ending was so anti-climatic I couldn't believe it.

1 of 5 people found this review helpful