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Publisher's Summary

She is a housewife: young, healthy, blissfully happy. He is an actor: charismatic and ambitious. The spacious, sun-filled apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side is their dream home, a dream that turns into an unspeakable nightmare.

Enter the chilling world of Ira Levin, where terror is as near as your new neighbors and where evil wears the most innocent face of all.

©1967 Ira Levin (P)2005 HarperCollinsPublishers, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    356
  • 4 Stars
    184
  • 3 Stars
    63
  • 2 Stars
    12
  • 1 Stars
    6

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    96
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    37
  • 2 Stars
    11
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    5

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Here Be Witches

Mia Farrow does a fine job of narrating this novel, as well as putting her own spin on the various characters' voices. Her performance of Minnie Castevet is a highlight--she manages to make her sound simultaneously comical and frightening. Despite having seen the film many times, it was great fun to listen to this audiobook and to picture oneself in poor Rosemary's shoes: Is she suffering from a pregnancy-induced paranoia, or are these neighbors of hers part of a witch's coven?

14 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Well Written, Great Fun

I liked this audio book. The narrator, who also starred in the movie, does a great job. The story is 70's horror fun. Well written. Story about a witches coven living in an apartment building and they want Rosemary's baby. You've probably seen the old movie but the book is much better. Spooky and a little weird and good listen!!!!!!

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Gerry
  • Auburn, AL, USA
  • 03-08-07

Excellent reading of a classic

This audiobook is even better than the movie and even more enjoyable for being read by Mia Farrow.

14 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Mia Farrow Breathes New Life Into Levin's Baby

I used to give full credit for the wonder of the film version of Ira Levin's, "Rosemary's Baby," to Roman Polanski alone. Now having heard Mia Farrow's narration, I am , for the first time, able to really enjoy the book. Levin's book always seemed to me to be the barest of bones, and left me, like so many horror novels, feeling dissatisfied in the extreme.

Well, my hat is off to Mia Farrow, who manages to bring enough of her Rosemary Woodhouse magic to give this thin volume much more excitement than I ever thought it could have. To me, it is like a different book; a book I now look forward to listening to again. I now actually feel quite enthusiastic about it. If you are considering downloading this, please do...don't bother with the print edition. Let Mia Farrow charm you and run away with your imagination. In my humble opinion, she elevates this to the highest level it will ever reach, off the screen. What a delight!

5 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Hail Mia! Hail Ira!

This is excellent... and Mia Farrow's performance is brilliant. I understand now why this novel was the bestselling novel of 1960s.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Absolutely amazing!

The novel does not disappoint at all, quite the opposite. Since I watched the movie so many times, it is impossible to tear them both apart. But I can imagine they work pretty well isolated from each other, but even better in a continuum. As you listen, it’s impossible not to associate Mia Farrow’s unique performance with the imagery, the set, the whole atmosphere of the movie. And the novel better explains certain passages that were not as developed in the movie. To put it blankly, the movie was incredible, the novel is absolutely amazing and Mia Farrow’s performance of innocent, somewhat shy, and yet, very lovely, fragile and yet incredibly strong (even though with no awareness regarding her own strength) Rosemary is an absolute delight! The tones and pitches she is able to carefully display throughout the narrative are undoubtedly the work of an extremely intelligent and sensitive artist, with a performance so unique and yet very realistic (SPOILER ALERT:

if you can apply such word to a story in which a woman is expecting the son of Satan.).

And in a very strange way, the author ends up bringing up themes of utmost relevance such as the burden of a patriarchal society upon women, the price one might pay for putting a blind eye not only to his/her instincts, but to evidence as well, the stigma regarding any woman’s allegedly “inappropriate” behaviour and the medicalisation of such in order to delegitimise her thoughts and opinions and how deceiving and dangerous can a mother’s love and inner expectations for her children be. It’s the stuff from which sociopaths, or

(SPOILER ALERT:)

Satan’s son in this particular case, are made of.

It is remarkable that so many years laters the novel is still so significant to women (and the matter regarding women’s rights and their everyday castration, or, to better put it: histerectomia and lobotomisation) and to society as well (by highlighting how many men try to lobotomise their espouses - and many other women - every single day, and how many espouses let them because the truth is hard to swallow, much harder than tannis root, and why would one swallow something that would take them away of their comfort zone, of what is expected of them? Rosemery tries, but eventually, fails. Not only because of other’s discouraging of her opinions, alarm and behaviour, but because once a baby is in the picture, it is very hard NOT to look the other way, not to feel guilty for doing the unexpected, and to actually admit to yourself that “Well, so much for motherhood! I literally - or not so literally - gave birth to the devil!”).

It is still such a modern book, to hell with the sanctity of the Church, that’s easy to mess up with, many books have done it. But this book dares to break with the sanctity of motherhood, parenting and the whole “how delightful it is to have a baby”, as well as many mothers’ deliberate blindness regarding their own children (and the possible consequences it may have). “Oh boy, boy...” the possible extent of its backfire!

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

story was good, the narrator wasn't too impressive

The narrator kept the voice of the characters for narration portions, it's pretty noticeable. Otherwise a good story

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Stacy
  • INDIANAPOLIS, IN, United States
  • 05-27-14

Man, Poor Rosemary...

What a really sucky thing to happen to a nice girl :) I haven't seen this movie so the story was a surprise for me, and although there are a lot of clues as to what's going to happen, the ending was kind of insane- baffling really! Fun listen- I didn't find it scary, but tense sometimes and Mia Farrow was great reading it.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Classic Horror, Still Scary After 50 Years

Geez, this was a scary listen. You wouldn't think after half a century this demon spawn story would still have the capacity to be so chilling, but there were times when I literally had to switch to something funny or light-hearted (or even boring) while driving, just to keep from being so spooked on the road. The book is obviously dated, sexist and racist (gender roles are still very stereotyped, and while a white man is just referred to as a man, a black man is always referred to as a Negro man), but nowhere near as glaringly as one might expect for 1966, and nowhere near as bad as in Jaws, which was written almost a decade later. This book has a timeless quality about it, and it made me want to re-watch the excellent 1968 Roman Polanski film. Mia Farrow (Rosemary in that film), who as you can hear for yourself in the sample reads a little too fast at the beginning of the book, settles down to a perfect pace after the first few pages and delivers a virtually flawless performance thereafter. Kudos to her and to Audible for making this indispensable classic available! Grade: A.

4 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • KimM
  • GREENVILLE, SC, United States
  • 05-21-12

Classically Creepy

Mia Farrow did an excellent job narrating this. I highly recommend this classic story of horror and a mother's love.

3 of 7 people found this review helpful