Regular price: $31.49

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Machineries of Empire, the most exciting science fiction trilogy of the decade, reaches its astonishing conclusion! 

When Shuos Jedao wakes up for the first time, several things go wrong. His few memories tell him that he's a 17-year-old cadet - but his body belongs to a man decades older. Hexarch Nirai Kujen orders Jedao to reconquer the fractured hexarchate on his behalf, even though Jedao has no memory of ever being a soldier, let alone a general. Surely a knack for video games doesn't qualify you to take charge of an army? 

Soon Jedao learns the situation is even worse. The Kel soldiers under his command may be compelled to obey him, but they hate him thanks to a massacre he can't remember committing. Kujen's friendliness can't hide the fact that he's a tyrant. And what's worse, Jedao and Kujen are being hunted by an enemy who knows more about Jedao and his crimes than he does himself....

©2018 Yoon Ha Lee (P)2018 Recorded Books

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    37
  • 4 Stars
    26
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    38
  • 4 Stars
    22
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    31
  • 4 Stars
    24
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A great conclusion to a great trilogy

Kel Cheris, with Jedao's memories sharing her brain, is seeking to destroy the greatest threat to the new calendar, which makes exotic effects contingent on the consent of the people targeted. That's the Nerai Hexarch, Kujen, whose immortality depends on maintaining the old calendar. (Yes, third book of a trilogy. Don't start here. Start with Ninefox Gambit; then Raven Strategem. You won't regret it.)

Kujen has created his own Jedao, who doesn't remember anything past age 17, but despite not having his memories, does seem to have the abilities he's told he has. Unfortunately, the fleet and the soldiers he's placed in command have to obey him, but they are free to hate him, because of a shocking massacre he committed but, of course, has no memory of.

Jedao also quickly learns that, outwardly friendly as he seems, Kujen is a brutal tyrant. The more he learns of current conditions, more than four centuries after the last memories he has of his prior life, the more committed he becomes to stopping Kujen, rather than completing the mission Kujen has given him.

Cheris, assorted servitors, and reluctant allies among the Compact forces Cheris is working with, all have a their goal destroying Kujen, also.

The question is, will they wind up working together, or defeating each other, leaving Kujen the victor?

This is an excellent conclusion to the trilogy, and an excellent story in itself.

Unfortunately, I listened to the audiobook.

The narrator has the ability to speak clearly and effectively, in a carrying tone that cuts through background noise, essential in listening to an audiobook in many circumstances. Unfortunately, she does that only with dialog. Much of the book is read very softly, with the result that, in practice, I needed my earpiece in at all times in order to listen to it--which meant I could only listen to it when it was comfortable and convenient to do that. It added a regrettable level of frustration to what was otherwise a very good book.

I bought this audiobook.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Calendrical closure

Revenant Gun is the 3rd installment in Yoon Ha Lee's Machineries of Empire trilogy. The Cheris/Jedao combo has been out of the picture for a while two forces initially vie for control of the new calendar, while a remaining Hexarc with the assistance of a new Jedao clone is attempting to reinstate the old calendar. Ironically, even though Cheris and the Jedao clone are ostensibly in opposition, they are aligned with regards to the barbaric customs that had maintained the original order, which can be traced to a Hexarc that is essentially immortal.

The sci-fi elements are in line with earlier installments with further exploration of both servitors which display rather advanced AI as well as a penchant for soap operas and the moth spaceships which turn out to grown, rather than made and display consciousness.

The narration is first rate with good character distinction with pacing and tone well suited to the pace of the plot.