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Publisher's Summary

New York Times best seller!

"Few are better positioned to illuminate the vagaries of this transformation than Galloway, a tech entrepreneur, author and professor at New York University’s Stern School. In brisk prose and catchy illustrations, he vividly demonstrates how the largest technology companies turned the crisis of the pandemic into the market-share-grabbing opportunity of a lifetime." (The New York Times)

"As good an analysis as you could wish to read." (The Financial Times)

From best-selling author and NYU Business School professor Scott Galloway comes a keenly insightful, urgent analysis of who stands to win and who's at risk to lose in a post-pandemic world

The COVID-19 outbreak has turned bedrooms into offices, pitted young against old, and widened the gaps between rich and poor, red and blue, the mask wearers and the mask haters. Some businesses - like home exercise company Peloton, video conference software maker Zoom, and Amazon - woke up to find themselves crushed under an avalanche of consumer demand. Others - like the restaurant, travel, hospitality, and live entertainment industries - scrambled to escape obliteration.

But as New York Times best-selling author Scott Galloway argues, the pandemic has not been a change agent so much as an accelerant of trends already well underway. In Post Corona, he outlines the contours of the crisis and the opportunities that lie ahead. Some businesses, like the powerful tech monopolies, will thrive as a result of the disruption. Other industries, like higher education, will struggle to maintain a value proposition that no longer makes sense when we can't stand shoulder to shoulder. And the pandemic has accelerated deeper trends in government and society, exposing a widening gap between our vision of America as a land of opportunity, and the troubling realities of our declining wellbeing.

Combining his signature humor and brash style with sharp business insights and the occasional dose of righteous anger, Galloway offers both warning and hope in equal measure. As he writes, "Our commonwealth didn't just happen, it was shaped. We chose this path - no trend is permanent and can't be made worse or corrected."

©2020 Scott Galloway (P)2020 Penguin Audio

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Rebranding Capitalism?

I came to this book after listening to Robert Reich’s The System and Zephyr Teachout's Break Em Up. Like Reich and Teachout, Galloway argues for the break-up of big tech and for a sort of rebranding of capitalism: less monopoly, less corruption, more government oversight to enable competition, opportunities for smaller businesses, wider paths to social mobility, and a broader middle class. The larger vision seems to be a progressive free market designed to bring about a more prosperous, humane society, one that includes more members of communities. More quality family time, better public schools, fewer breaks for the 1%. While the ethical spirit of the book seems sincere, Galloway's faith the virtue of the free market is also puzzling sometimes. For instance, he advocates for breaking up big tech yet also for big tech's takeover of higher ed. Odd. I get his logic that higher ed has come to monopolize professional certification, and the inflated costs of tuition, resulting in student loan debt. Yet it’s hard to envision how a collaboration between elite universities and big tech solves income inequality and social mobility. It seems likelier, as Galloway concedes at times, that a big-tech/elite university collaboration would instead lead to a larger concentration of wealth and resources in the hands of a few elite, luxury brands. In the end, it seems likely that a disruption of higher education would benefit fewer universities, fewer "star professors," and fewer tech companies, leaving the rest behind.
It's also unclear how remaking higher ed in the image of big tech squares with Galloway's commitment to stronger public K-12 schools and more investment in public higher ed. Given Galloway's position as a popular business professor an elite university, the whole plan seems, well, self-serving. And the calls for social justice at times seem more like a rebranding strategy than a true progressive politics. Not that the book isn’t worth reading. As a whole, it's thought-provoking, Informative, and perhaps its speculations and solutions will prove correct. I also appreciate Galloway's writing. The style is entertaining and inventive. He's able to take complex topics and present them in clear, lucid, humorous prose. I'm willing to give him the benefit of the doubt and accept that his ethical concern for people during times of crisis is sincere. The book is certainly timely and filled with wisdom. Good narration too, though the volume is a bit inconsistent.

24 people found this helpful

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Where is the PDF?

I very much like pretty much everything from Prof G. I love this book, but was disappointed that there is no PDF for the chart referred to in the book. Please add it.

18 people found this helpful

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  • K
  • 12-27-20

No need to read if you follow Galloway

I am huge fan of Scott Galloway and regularly read his blog posts and listen to his podcasts. However, this book is basically a collection of what he has been discussing over the past year. Not a lot of new content. If you are new to Galloway, this is an important read.

9 people found this helpful

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So Smart, So On Target, Must-Listening

NYU prof Scott Galloway delivers a laser-clear look at America in the age of Corona, limning the opportunities and challenges in the months and years ahead. He’s a capitalist with a heart. I wish all Americans would listen to this, starting with my 18-year-old son. I may listen to it again!

6 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars

When u get tired of partisanship, this guy

Author puts himself out there, no fear. Excellent analysis by someone who knows his stuff. When he later turns out to be wrong about a few things, I expect him to admit it and own it.

It's the only way. That's a good recipe for epistemology. This is a guy worth listening to. Especially for folks like me, who aren't looking for leaders to follow.

I end up wishing he were my neighbor! Smart, humble, usually accurate. Future-facing.

3 people found this helpful

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Give this a listen!

Who can possibly understand what's happening now, and what will come next?

A good bet is to seek an opinion from an entrepreneur, business analyst, business strategy professor at a leading business school with several books under his belt, major company board seats in his history and a practice of thinking in public on a newsletter, multiple podcasts and on television. At the risk of inflating Scott's already prodigious ego (or at least the performative aspect of it he uses to protect what is likely really behind the shield of self aware braggadocio) it is worthwhile to acknowledge his experience and the unique value it lends his analyses.

If you listen to his podcasts, read his newsletter or have read his previous books, there is very little that will surprise you here as new content. What this book does deliver is additional thought and organization to Scott's key theories and lines of thinking:
-COVID-19 is accelerating a decade of change in months
-The Big and especially big tech and especially The Four are the biggest winners
-They innovate and leverage strategic strengths but mostly they are big monopolies
-They will seek entry into medicine, pharma, government and education because these are the only sectors big enough to justify their stock prices
-There will and must be massive disruption in our economy overall and especially these sectors
-The wealthy and the stockholder class continue to become more wealthy and powerful
-The poor, the vulnerable and the oppressed continue to be oppressed
-We continue to sacrifice the future of our children for convenience of the wealthy and powerful now
-We need massive governmental overhaul and intervention to change the dynamics of capitalism on the way up and socialism on the way down for companies and the wealthy
-We need a Corona Corps and a new Marshall Plan to remake our country and commonwealth

If you listen to the audible version like I did, and are used to listening to Scotts Pods on his own and with Kara Swisher this will be very familiar in both form and content, with the exception of cleaner language, more polished editing and deliver and less riffing and bouncing of guests and co host's energy. I would have liked a PDF to show the charts in addition to Scott's description of what the charts depict (like other audible books have.)

Four stars means I liked it a lot, will likely read it again and strongly recommend it to any others with interest in the topics covered.

2 people found this helpful

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Thin soup

You won’t be missing much if you don’t read this book. Nothing terribly new pick up an economist magazine and you’ll get a whole lot more in five hours for less than a credit

1 person found this helpful

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Thought provoking

Especially insightful on higher education and the effects of COVID on e-commerce and monopoly power.

1 person found this helpful

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  • TY
  • 12-13-20

It’s just ok

I love Prof G. and I think he is talented and intelligent. If you’ve listened to any of his podcasts then you’ve already read/listened to this book. Not much new here, recycled stories, parts of the book doesn’t even have anything to do with Corona. It just seems incomplete or not much thought put into it.

1 person found this helpful

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Another Prof G winner

Fantastic book. If you're a regular listener to the Prof G Pod then a lot of it will be familiar but worth rhd listen all the same.