• Portobello

  • A Novel
  • By: Ruth Rendell
  • Narrated by: Tim Curry
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • 4.0 out of 5 stars (157 ratings)

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Portobello  By  cover art

Portobello

By: Ruth Rendell
Narrated by: Tim Curry
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Publisher's summary

Ruth Rendell is widely considered to be crime fiction’s reigning queen. In Portobello, she delivers a captivating and intricate tale that weaves together the troubled lives of several people in the gentrified neighborhood of London’s Notting Hill.

Walking to the shops one day, 50-year-old Eugene Wren discovers an envelope on the street bulging with cash. A man plagued by a shameful addiction - and his own good intentions - Wren hatches a plan to find the money’s rightful owner. Instead of going to the police, or taking the cash for himself, he prints a notice and posts it around Portobello Road. This ill-conceived act creates a chain of events that links Wren to other Londoners - people afflicted with their own obsessions and despairs. As these volatile characters come into Wren’s life - and the life of his trusting fiancée - the consequences will change them all. Portobello is a wonderfully complex tour de force featuring a dazzling depiction of one of London’s most intriguing neighborhoods - and the dangers beneath its newly posh veneer.

©2010 Ruth Rendell (P)2010 Random House Audio

Critic reviews

"Rendell is particularly adept at portraying young people just a dole check away from homelessness as well as the carelessness and callousness of the book's upper-middle-class characters. Her style has become ever more spare while retaining its subtle psychology and vivid sense of place." ( Publishers Weekly)