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Publisher's Summary

“Sustainable” has long been the rallying cry of agricultural progressives; given that much of our nation’s farm and ranch land is already degraded, however, sustainable agriculture often means maintaining a less-than-ideal status quo. Industrial agriculture has also co-opted the term for marketing purposes without implementing better practices. Stephanie Anderson argues that in order to provide nutrient-rich food and fight climate change, we need to move beyond sustainable to regenerative agriculture, a practice that is highly tailored to local environments and renews resources.

In One Size Fits None, Anderson follows diverse farmers across the United States: A South Dakota bison rancher who provides an alternative to the industrial feedlot; an organic vegetable farmer in Florida who harvests microgreens; a New Mexico super-small farmer who revitalizes communities; and a North Dakota midsize farmer who combines livestock and grain farming to convert expensive farmland back to native prairie. The use of these nontraditional agricultural techniques show how varied operations can give back to the earth rather than degrade it. 

The book is published by University of Nebraska Press. The audiobook is published by University Press Audiobooks.

"An invaluable resource, a step in the right direction of imagining alternative way of doing and organizing life around the soil and farming." (Grist: A Journal of the Literary Arts)

“A brave and clear-eyed book by a farmer’s daughter about the problems in our agriculture and the factors that keep farmers from making it better.” (Kristin Ohlson, author of The Soil Will Save Us)

“Should be required listening for anyone who yearns for a clear-headed and informed account of our dysfunctional corporate food system.” (Andrew Furman, author of Bitten: My Unexpected Love Affair with Florida)

©2019 Stephanie Anderson (P)2019 Redwood Audiobooks

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What listeners say about One Size Fits None

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Very informative planning to recommend to friends

This book was interesting and I learned a lot. Some of it I knew, some I had already known, some I had inklings were happening but it explains a lot of why foods thay we have eaten for centuries are no longer the nutritional powerhouses they used to be.

We need soil, healthy soil. I learned that lessen just trying to plant a front yard garden at my home and nothing grew the way they had in gardens past. I found out the home on this lot previously had burnt down and the dirt was never replaced so it is filled with garbage and the soil was wiped.

So much work needs to be done to insure people will not starve over the next decades, we need to stop catering to the big corporations thay make equally big political donations, and only care about today's bottom line before we will no longer be able to support ourselves.

6 people found this helpful

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a revealing account of modern agriculture

great details on how politics and economics have pushed modern farmers into the role of factory workers producing unhealthy cheap food and how we can change that for the better.

4 people found this helpful

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Excellent book

I really enjoyed this audio-book. Stephanie's description of different farms attempting to move toward regenerative farming practices was an eye opener. It is so informative and I have encouraged others to listen to it.

3 people found this helpful

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There is a lot of negativity

There is lot of negativity. A lot of what everyone is doing wrong and not how to it better. But I still liked it overall.

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Wonderful lit review

The reason I suggest a literature review is that the author has done the “difficult” work of collecting interesting observations from cross system / cross section. I do appreciate that she has taken the time to be very polite to all perspectives and take a easy handed approach at the systems selected for review.

This book was well written. Great read for someone new to regenerative agriculture. I would recommend “Restoration Agriculture” - Shepard; “Dirt to Soil” - Brown; “Gaia’s Garden” - Hemenway

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An informative and entertaining listen

Inspirational; unique in that its told from a conventional farmer's daughter. the case studies lend insight into the varied experiences of different farm operations

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Concept is good

I love the concept and the passion of this book but it can be misleading in some areas. For instance, organic farming doesn’t really mean regenerative. I understand where she drew the connection but it’s a stretch in some of the operations she highlights. Also does a very good job of demonizing CAFOs, which doesn’t help the overall message. What she describes them as would be worst-case scenario, and it’s misleading to the uninformed reader (or listener). As somebody who knows better, I’m less likely to accept her overall message (even though I agree with it) because she uses misleading information and emotional descriptions in an attempt to more easily convince readers to believe her. The evidence for regenerative ag speaks for itself, I think she should let it do so without making enemies within the agricultural community.

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Can't listen

The narrator is horrible. She reads with such drama in her voice, so cheesy and overplaying, I can't take the subject seriously. I've read quite a few books about regenerative agriculture and unconventional farming, this one by bar the worst. This book is for young, easily impressed people who don't know anything about farming yet. Even then, I think they'd get bored soon. On top of slow intro, dramatic content, and poor narration, the actor speaks like she has a mouthful of nuts, very distracting and annoying, somebody has to fix her. I am returning this item.

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Thought provoking

Although I thought I knew a lot about this subject, I found that the author made me look at everything from a new perspective. The narrator grabbed my attention from start to finish - I was riveted!

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Incredible

Really well written journey through agriculture. I loved this book and will be sharing with with friends and family. Thanks!!!

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  • Anonymous User
  • 12-10-20

good review

informative.
read others by alan and gabe and this touches on those with the experience.
its like a reporters view of the need to go regenerative.