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My Lost Family

An Audible Original
Narrated by: Danny Ben-Moshe
Length: 2 hrs and 13 mins
Categories: Fiction, Literary
4.5 out of 5 stars (3,476 ratings)

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Our favorite moments from My Lost Family

The letter that changed everything
"What are people going to think?"
The day the children disappeared

  • My Lost Family
  • The letter that changed everything
  • My Lost Family
  • "What are people going to think?"
  • My Lost Family
  • The day the children disappeared

"Funny, sprawling and powerfully touching…like such a breath of fresh air."

Rachel Cook, New Statesman America on Ben-Moshe’s documentary on My Mother's Lost Children
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Danny Ben-Moshe

About the Creator and Performer

Danny Ben-Moshe is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and founder of Identity Films in Melbourne, Australia. His film, China’s Artful Dissident, was broadcast in June 2019 on the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre (ABC, Australia). Danny has a penchant for Jewish stories, including Outback Rabbis (PBS) and My Mother’s Lost Children (BBC), an epic family saga told across five continents and six decades.

Prior to his career as a filmmaker, Danny was an associate professor at Victoria University and Deakin University in Australia. He is the author of over 30 academic articles on racism, diasporas, Jewish identity, and Israel. He is a graduate in law and politics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London and received a PhD in Jewish studies from the University of Melbourne.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Story

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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Heartbreaking true story

I selected this book from my Audio list. The description intrigued me and I wanted to find out all about this “Lost Family“.
How would you feel if your children’s father came to visit them, took them to the park, and all three disappeared? This is a true story of what one woman went through. After 50 years she finally gets answers.
I was spellbound and horrified at what the children went through and the type of man their father turned out to be.
This was well worth a listen. The characters in the story are voiced by the actual people - this made the story more compelling.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Well put together but........

This was extremely brave for the family to not only seek out but to share with all of us. Unfortunately I cannot share the same feelings the daughter shared about her father. No father should put their children through what he put his children through. I am also slightly saddened by the mother’s view about not searching for her children. I understand it was a different time and place, but how can a parent not try everything to find their children?

31 of 34 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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uggghhh

I listened to the whole story as painful as it was... from the description you believe you are going to listen to an emotional heartfelt story of someone who lost everything but later finds them... instead I got a matter of fact story that could've been summed up in 1 paragraph. The mother is a self centered woman that keeps reminding her son how fortunate she was not to have raised her children because she was able to have a life... then there is the father who is a narcissistic asshole who has no idea why what he did could be problematic... Do better Audible...

100 of 117 people found this review helpful

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Enjoyable short read

This was an intriguing enjoyable story that really took me by surprise as I heard the perspective of each family member.

13 of 15 people found this review helpful

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upsetting story of lives gone wrong

I am so speechless about the mother. all the children in this story are the real victims. the mother is so matter of fact about how it happened. strange but she is like well it happened. sad, just sad

27 of 32 people found this review helpful

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great listen

the story is an unbelievably sad but has a lovely ending. definitely worth the listen!

12 of 14 people found this review helpful

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My heart goes out to this poor mother

A moving story. My mum is the same age as Lillian and grew up in a similar, poor, working class area of London. A charming, wealthy Iranian man gets her pregnant when she’s only 15. When she’s still a teenager, he kidnaps their two children. He’s their father: it’s not a crime. Many young girls at that time were forced to give up children for adoption and encouraged to marry, have more kids and move on. Lillian would’ve been treated in the same way, even though her children were kidnapped. To this day, her son, who she has now met up with, can’t understand the society and culture his mother came from. He thinks she didn’t try to find him. Like my mum, Lillian viewed going overseas in search of her children like going to the moon: she wouldn’t have had a passport, wouldn’t have been able to afford a plane ticket and wouldn’t have known that there was an Iranian embassy in London that might’ve been able to help - although would probably have just told her that her kids were her husband’s property.
To hear her talk about how it’s all in the past, she moved on and had another life etc, is particularly hard, as it smacks of other people’s words and her attempt to look on the bright side, after a lifetime of trauma.
Spoiler: what happens to her scumbag ex husband st the end, while obviously wrong, won’t leave feminists too upset!

20 of 24 people found this review helpful

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An exercise in damage control

Interesting viewpoints from members of an extended family, of the ripples resulting from the actions of one person. My takeaway is that, even if you can’t avoid those destructive people, you can try to reconnect or make peace with others to help stop or ameliorate the damage caused.
We need to trust in others to lead a healthy life, but we need to be aware of the foibles or dark side in those others, too. God help us when our own foibles or ignorance meshes with, or falls prey to, others.

19 of 23 people found this review helpful

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Really Enjoyed

This podcast was such a joy to listen to. But also very insightful and enlightening for me.

My husband had a difficult upbringing and his childhood haunts him today. Some of the parts I was like...wow! I get it! In understanding some of my husbands pain.

11 of 13 people found this review helpful

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Just say you're sorry to your kids!

Please, for the love of God, just say you're sorry for not looking hard enough for them, for going on just too easily with you're life. All she does is make the excuse that she was so young. Back in the Dulce Maria Alavez’s women didn't go off to college or have careers as they do now, they married & had children. This didn't happen when she was 16 & found herself with an unplanned pregnancy, she had a second child with the man, while "having" to live with her family. she acts as if she had no choices in her life but she did. Then as her son says, all she had to do is fill out forms and she would have found them but she didn't even do that. Even when she remarried, and apparently had a better life, she never found the time to go to the embassy? Right in her own country? I understand not traveling to a foreign country without speaking the language (not that it could have stopped me or any mother I know) she just has excuses, JUST SAY YOU'RE SORRY, it goes a long way towards forgiveness and they need to hear it.

16 of 20 people found this review helpful