adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $6.95

Buy for $6.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Italian shoes, a house in the hills, a gift for stretching the truth, and a petulant assistant to pick the scallions out of his Szechuan noodles - Hollywood producer Davis Mizlansky has it all. But he's about to lose it to the IRS unless he can pull off one more deal. A stellar cast performs this hilarious send-up of modern-day Hollywood.
©2007 L.A. Theatre Works (P)2007 L.A. Theatre Works

What listeners say about Mizlansky/Zilinsky

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Mel Brooks meets David Mamet.

An odd and wonderful one-act, though peculiarly, if not intentionally, derivative. (Mild spoiler) Nathan Lane and a recalcitrant partner attempt to get rich off a scheme to produce a creative endeavor essentially intended to fail, with references along the way to anti-semitism, Hitler, and the Holocaust. Sound familiar? The “mark” is even named DeVries, echoing “De Bris” in The Producers. I’ve always suspected the title is a little pastiche of “Glengarry Glen Ross”, and certain slimy characters and intrigues here would seem to nicely fit such a reference. Everyone’s terrific in it, and, like the best writing for radio plays, everything you need to know is in the dialogue, and all exposition is naturally, elegantly delivered. Not a word would seem redundant in a visual production (and this is, indeed, an adaptation of the stage version for audio only) Love this show.