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Publisher's Summary

Sometimes rumor, sometimes based on fact and often misunderstood, the tenets of Islamic law and dogma were not set in the religion's founding moments. They were developed, like in other world religions, over centuries by the clerical class of Muslim scholars.

Misquoting Muhammad takes listeners back in time through Islamic civilization and traces how and why such controversies developed, offering an inside view into how key and controversial aspects of Islam took shape. Misquoting Muhammad lays out how Muslim intellectuals have sought to balance reason and revelation, weigh science and religion, and negotiate the eternal truths of scripture amid shifting values.

©2014 Jonathan A. C. Brown (P)2017 Tantor

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Fascinating and relevant

A great idea and a great book. This is perfect for anyone who actually wants to learn about Islam, rather than just confirm a positive or negative bias. I was very impressed that Brown was able to maintain an academic perspective through some of the more controversial subjects like jihad, gender, child marriage, apostasy, and reformation.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Fantastic Book, Horrible Arabic Pronunciation

Brown's book is a well-researched introduction to and explication of the history of the Ahadeeth (Prophetic Traditions) and the challenges faced by Islamic scholars (and laymen) in interpreting and using them to help form and apply/practice Islamic Law.

While the narrator does a good job overall, his pronunciation of Arabic terms is cringe-worthy to anyone familiar with the Arabic language. It was so bad at times I almost stopped listening. Here are a few (transliterated) examples:

It's Muhammad not Mukhaamed
Maalik not Maleek
Waliullah not Waali Aalah
Qur'aan not Kooran
Ulemaa not Ooo Llama

And the list goes on.

It would have been much better to have used a narrator who had at least a basic understanding of Arabic pronunciation, especially in a book that uses so many Arabic terms on every page. Other than that it was a fantastic read (listen) that I recommend to anyone interested in the subject matter.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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An academic view on the controversies surrounding Hadith

The author is a formidable scholar in Islamic studies and presents objective criticisms surrounding specific Hadiths which may have particular consequences upon culture, social relations, and law.

Slightly difficult to follow in Audiobook format due to chapter sections jumping around chronologically, but informative and engaging nonetheless.

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  • Abdirahim Aden
  • 03-26-18

Balanced View of Scriptural History

Accurately depicts controversial aspects of scriptural interpretation and its evolutions. Argues that historical interpretation and understanding needs to be upheld even in the modern times insofar that they are set in stone. However, there are a lot of room for new understanding in issues of fiqh which alter with time and situation. Showed that renowned scholars of early Muslims differed on issues respectfully as long as it came from an opinion derived from evidenced scriptural understanding.

Most interestingly showed that early scholars not so critical of hadith that spoke of ample rewards and last days as they promoted better adherence by Muslims. Hadith scholars like Bukhari were not infallible in their Sahih collection but it was important to set it in stone so believers are not confused due to lack of knowledge. Hence Ahmed Ibn Hanbal preferred weak hadith over ones human intellectual opinion which fluctuates with the environment.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • kjhjf
  • 03-28-18

very good

This will change many minds on Islam in a good way. well researched, will recommend this book to everyone.