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Publisher's Summary

After the Civil War, the fight for civil rights spawned a multitude of heroic African American activists, but it is remembered in large part for the work of a few iconic African American men of stature. Much like their later counterparts, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X, the debate between gradual integration through temporary accommodation and overtly insistent activism was led by Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois. Through the last years of the 19th century, Washington’s gentler approach of enhancing Black prospects through vocational education, largely accomplished with white permission and funds, seemed the popular choice. His legacy can be sensed in King’s subsequent willingness to extend an olive branch to white Americans in a sense of unity, although Washington’s propensity for accommodation held no place in King’s ministry. 

Ultimately, however, the vision that oversaw the creation of the Tuskegee Institute faded in the early 20th century as Black intellectualism and stiffening resolve came to the fore. This side’s greatest proponent, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, still stands among the greatest and most controversial minds of any Black leader in his country. The first African American to receive a doctorate from Harvard University, Du Bois rose to become one of the most important social thinkers of his time in a 70-year career of combined scholarship, teaching, and activism. 

The third and most improbable approach toward American civil rights for Black citizens blended the beliefs of Washington and Du Bois, and it was spearheaded by global activist Marcus Aurelius Garvey. The Jamaican began his career as an activist with a devotion to Washington’s path, but he subsequently leaned to the alternative and beyond. Beyond the worldview of both colleagues, Marcus Garvey’s bigger-than-life scheme was to establish a Black-owned and managed shipping line to transport much of America’s Black population back to Africa. Repatriation of Black residents to the African continent had been proposed and debated before, even by Abraham Lincoln, but Garvey’s second and equally prodigious vision proposed that once the African diaspora returned to its homeland, an immense empire would assume rule over the continent, housing Black cultures from around the globe. This realization of racial segregation would be a boon to Black and White societies, at peace but thriving in distinctly separate cultures and economies from the white world. 

©2018 Charles River Editors (P)2018 Charles River Editors

What listeners say about Marcus Garvey: The Life and Legacy of the Jamaican Political Leader Who Championed Pan-Africanism

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very disappointed with this book

I did not care for the reader. At times he seemed rushed and who ever recorded it had words consecutively repeated. The authors point of view seems out of touch. Don't waste your time or money

19 people found this helpful

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NO!

This "story" is missing so many points! This is supposed to be about M.Garvey and his works, his life, and education. This is about what we already know...racism, unfairness, the stupidy shown to black people, and other great black leaders.
Huh.....the narrator sounds as if there were no punctuation used! This sounds like a long ass run-on sentence:(

10 people found this helpful

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Truth is always twisted

If I were born in a different country I would have a different belief about many of the African in America scholars be they traditionally educated or not. While this isn't the case I Am born and reared in a country which for reasons of fear make sure to change the narrative of many Africans; be they American, direct from Africa, or across the globe. With this in mind and my review if this particular book I can say the only way for me to have had a thought was to have listened for which I'm grateful.
The listening provides great info but to speak to the manner in which Mr. Garvey's persona is described is shameful if not worse. It can never be that one who doesn't live the life of an African regardless of location can or will properly describe a manner in truth. When a person is given a vision that vision must be guarded in so many ways it will seem almost impossible. That vision is treated as a child with the understanding no one else will be the better caretaker of that child. When the visioneer is African, the work increases in ways those non-African will not have as a concern. This is as true this day as it was during Mr. Garvey's era. This is to state the pettiness of the compilator with regards to whom Mr. Garvey saw of himself in display with such a poor and purposefully demeaning description. It is an unfortunate situation that Mr. Garvey was more than able to step into his self-awareness and be torn down for what he had historical rights and natural inheritance to do only to be somewhat diminished for. While this is the case with this info what will not happen is the diminishing of his spirit regardless of his style, manner, and comprehension of what his vision showed him. No amount of petty verbiage will discolored the minds if those he led to a better way of life...

4 people found this helpful

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Insulting and Informative

This book was difficult to finish. The author simultaneously praised and insulted Marcus Garvey throughout the book.

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A good read, prepare yourself

I like how this book seems showcase both the positives and negatives of his character. I was taught many of his “positive” accomplishments but not the negatives. Some of his character flaws were put on display and I appreciate that. This is a good book and it has enticed me to continue to read more on Mr. Garvey.

2 people found this helpful

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interesting

This is very informative ,there is a lot to learn about black history. we nee more people like Marcus Garvey

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I'd didn't love this book but I got the message

I think the narrative of this book spoke more so to Garvey's arrogant aire than his positive input on the black community. Perhaps, I myself am being bias as I am a Jamaican Panamanian. But I was able to comprehend it's messages as I sift through the mentioned narcissism.

1 person found this helpful

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this is suppose to be a picture book

good summary of Marcus Garvey but I think the photos are a big part of the experience

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Marcus Messiah Garvey the new John The Baptist.

Loved the book and presentation. This should be a must read in American primary schools.
One Love

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great crash course on Marcus Garvey

I remember in school during BHM being told about Marcus Garvey and how he wanted to get African Americans back to Africa. little did I know he was one of the forefathers of pan africanism. For not knowing much I sure did learn a lot. I hope Hollywood is woke enough to make a movie about him