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Love Thy Neighbor

A Story of War
Narrated by: George Guidall
Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
5 out of 5 stars (56 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize Peter Maass went to the Balkans as a reporter at the height of the nightmarish war there, but this audiobook is not traditional war reportage.

Maass examines how an ordinary Serb could wake up one morning and shoot his neighbor, once a friend - then rape that neighbor's wife. He conveys the desperation that makes a Muslim beg the United States to bomb his own city in order to end the misery. And Maass does not falter at the spectacle of U.N. soldiers shining searchlights on fleeing refugees - who are promptly gunned down by snipers waiting in the darkness.

Love Thy Neighbor gives us an unflinching vision of a late-20th-century hell that is also a scathing inquiry into the worst extremes of human nature. Like Michael Herr's Dispatches, it is an utterly gripping audiobook that will move and instruct us for years to come.

©1996 Peter Maass (P)2018 Tantor

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  • Overall
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    5 out of 5 stars

Disturbing? Enlightening? Educational?

I've never reviewed an audio book or any book for that matter. This is my forth attempt and no matter what, I'm not deleting and starting a fifth. This story is a gut punch of reality that everyone should hear. I had family over there during the war and I never knew how bad it was or even asked for that matter. This story is not a history lesson written by the winning side. It's more like listening to a man who's actually been to hell as an observer, spoken to the devil, witnessed the horror and lived to tell about it. I couldn't put it down. I think that's all I can say.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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History that needs to be heard

Good book, hard at times to listen threw due to the treatment of the people. Hard to believe that this happened. Very enlightening a conflict that needs taught in schools. Another time when history repeats itself, when the politicians in power and the UN dropped the ball.

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Absolutely amazing

I have spent a lot of time in Serbia for work but this book gave me a new appreciation for the complexities and horrors of the turbulent post-Tito years. The writing was phenomenal, and the narration for the audio book was so good I want to listen to whatever else the reader reads just because he was so enjoyable.

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Incredible book

This book was extremely well written, and touched my soul in ways that I did not expect

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Compelling but Repetitive

3.5 stars. An important work on this little-known war that is confusing to so many. This book will give you a great "picture" of that war but lacks a solid telling of military history. I suspect the author patched together many of his news reports because he tends to repeat himself of cover similar material.

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I wish I knew all of this years ago. Great read.

Well written and incredibly informing, should be required reading in high school. I could even read again.

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An intimate but biased view

"I nodded my head, said I was grateful for their interest in my work, and waited for them to berate me for being biased, anti-Serb… a liar." (Chapter 10) The book gives a vivid and intimate view of the Bosnian war, but is marred by Maass’ bias against the ethnic Serbs. The picture painted is very much one-sided. Maass exonerates both the Turkish and Titoist rule from contributing to the conflict, and blames the rise of nationalism. This makes his depiction of the region as a model of pluralism somewhat comical… where did the nationalism come from? It seems the hows and whys are best left to other authors. Where book shines is capturing the street-level absurdities of the war. Former neighbors taunting each other over radios, soldiers singing Sinatra tunes edited into promoting rape, and students taking off weekends to squeeze shots off at Bosniaks… only to return to school on Monday. It’s gauchely surreal.