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Lenin's Tomb

The Last Days of the Soviet Empire
Narrated by: Michael Prichard
Length: 29 hrs and 6 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (210 ratings)
Regular price: $48.95
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Publisher's Summary

In the tradition of John Reed's classic Ten Days That Shook the World, this best-selling account of the collapse of the Soviet Union combines the global vision of the best historical scholarship with the immediacy of eyewitness journalism.

©2015 David Remnick (P)2015 Random House Audio

Critic Reviews

"A moving illumination.... Remnick is the witness for us all." ( The Wall Street Journal)
"An engrossing and essential addition to the human and political literature of our time." ( The New York Times)
"The most eloquent chronicle of the Soviet empire's demise published to date.... It is hard to conceive of a work that might surpass it." (Francine du Plessix Gray, Washington Post Book World)

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  • Darwin8u
  • Mesa, AZ, United States
  • 06-18-18

Society is sick of history. It is too much with us

"Society is sick of history. It is too mucy with us."
- Arseny Roginsky, quoted in David Remnick, Lenin's Tomb

While Remnick was writing for the Washington Post in Moscow, my family was living in Izmir, Turkey and then in Bitburg, Germany. We got the opportunity to travel to Moscow shortly after the August, 1991 (the beginning of my Senior year) Coup. It was a strange period. So much changed so fast. I was trading my Levi jeans in St. Petersburg and Moscow for Communist flags, Army medals, busts of Lenin. It was only as I got older that I realized both how crazy the USSR/Russia was during that time and how blessed the Washington Post was to have David Remnick writing "home" about it.

I've read other books by Remnick (The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama and King of the World: Muhammad Ali and the Rise of an American Hero, and parts of Reporting: Writings from The New Yorker). The New Yorker is where I discovered and fell in love with his prose. So, with Remnick, I was reading backwards. It was time I read what is perhaps his greatest work. Lenin's Tomb is a comprehensive look at the last years of the Soviet Union from the election of Gorbachev (with occasional backward glances at Khrushchev, etc. It was nice to get more information about Andrei Sakharov (I knew only broad aspects of his story, and still need to read more) and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (I know more about him, but need to read more of his work).

Some of this isn't dated. No. That is the wrong word. It is history, and by definition all history is dated, but the book ends with a lot of potential energy. It is sad to see that a lot of the potential for Russia's democracy has been lost into the authoritarianism of Putin. It is also scary to read quotes from Vladimir Zhirinovsky, and unabaashed neofacists who won 8 million votes in 1991, and hear words that could easily have been spoken by Donald Trump. Nations and regimes are never as solid as we think. Often the corruption that exists for years, like a cavity, eats away at the insitutions until they become empty husks and everything colapses. Perhaps, that is one lesson WE in the United States (and Europe) should learn from the Soviet Union's collapse in the early 90s. Perhaps, it is too late.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

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One of the best books I've listened to on Audible

What was one of the most memorable moments of Lenin's Tomb?

There were several. The author's efforts to contact Kaganovich, descriptions of Magadan and Solzhenitsyn, the subtle underlying antisemitism, the origins of Mikhail Sergeyevitch, and more.

What about Michael Prichard’s performance did you like?

I thought it was superb. He was engaging and I always found myself wanting to keep listening.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Not an extreme reaction, but I did have a considerably greater desire to keep listening

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!"

If I hadn't become a musician, I am sure I would have become a historian. I love history and reading a well written history book is just heaven for me. This is a very well written book by a man who knew what he was talking about. Mr. Remnick was a (Jewish!) reporter who lived in the USSR through the Gorbachev years right up through the time of Boris Yeltsin when the USSR became Russia again. He spoke with Gorbachev on several occasions, as well as many other high level people in the Soviet government. He took his young bride with him when he received the assignment, and his son was born in Russia, so he was very connected to the country and its people.

His insights, his scope of understanding and his ability to put things into perspective without getting preachy or moralizing helped me to see this part of history more clearly and allowed me to draw my own conclusions. Here is one of my conclusions: God Bless America! When I read of the extreme hardships the Russian people had to endure because of their selfish leadership I truly cried. My heart was breaking as I read of the fishermen who had boatloads of top grade salmon ready to take to market, but had to wait for approval of the government before they could bring them ashore. By that time, the fish that could have fed thousands of starving Russians had rotted. I live in a modest sized home in a fairly nice neighborhood, but I sometimes lament that there is not enough room in my house for everything I want. I was humbled when I realized that many Soviet citizens were living in an apartment the size of my walk-in closet. People who were divorced had to continue living together for years because they could not get a second apartment. Medical care was next to non-existent. And on and on. Our first world problems are sniveling and unimportant when compared with those of this sad country.

And their problems are far from resolved. Although things have improved, the crime has sky rocketed. As one person put it, "Freedom has created more Al Capones and fewer Henry Fords." I hope they can find their way out of this darkness, but i don't think it will be any time soon. It is a country with vast potential, but things must improve before they can come close to reaching it.

Michael Prichard was an excellent narrator for this book. He seemed to understand the Russian pronunciations because they rolled off his tongue with ease. I say this, but not understanding Russian myself I could be mistaken. But compared to what Russian I have heard, it seemed to be spot on.

7 of 10 people found this review helpful

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Perfect

All around perfect literary experience. Remnick is a Titan of journalistic history on par with William Shirer. Utterly flawless. Highly recommended.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • ESB
  • VA, United States
  • 11-23-17

Great Info, but Format Awkward

The information in the book is priceless. I learned a lot. However, the organization I hated. Was hard to follow who was speaking at times and how the book was organized. I am sure this is all compounded by it being an audible book. Audible would do itself a great service by adding to it a section where one could see a table of contents and maps/pics.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Tot
  • SUDBURY, MA
  • 02-22-19

The moral complexity of a comic book

It is very difficult for me to dislike a book on Soviet history, such an interesting topic. But my god is this author a cry baby. Whine, whine, whine. Its all he does. I felt like I was reading an extended op-Ed piece from vice on Tump, or one on Obama by Fox.

It’s just polemics on polemics sprinkled with rhetoric. I have no sympathy for communism, or the Soviet regime, but my god is he mind numbingly one sided.

It’s a book filled with personal stories, and I have no problem with that. But everyone is either a diabolical villain or a selfless hero. If you’re going for the human interest angle, I expect a little more nuance than that.

Every other account of Soviet history has had the good sense to at least describe the motivations behind why some of the “bad guys” did what they did, and qualified the “good guys” by humanizing them with some faults.

But he just comes off as an arrogant jerk completely unwilling to engage with or try to understand those within the Soviet government. I agree Mr. Remnick, I also think they aren’t the worlds greatest guys, terrible even, but I didn’t buy your book to read your personal opinion or snide remarks about the communist leadership, I bought it to try and learn something, which you as an interviewer can’t facilitate because you’re too busy interjecting your own opinions. There’s not a single word he lets people he doesn’t like get in edge wise without him qualifying it with a pages worth of snarky jokes/comments telling you what to think, and it’s just gives you the impression he’s heavily edited and screwed everything in his own favor.

Remnick has no interest in reality though, or teaching you anything. He’s written an overlong mess with comic-book/nursery rhyme tier moral complexity. In his world there are only innocent victims and evil lecherous wolves. Now that I know he is in fact a professional journalist who writes mostly opinion pieces, this makes sense, but a historian, he is most certainly not.

Buy if you find yourself often listening to talk radio, reading op-Eds, watching cable pundits, etc. It is likely you’ll be comfortable with Remnick’s estimation of your intelligence as a reader (that you can’t be trusted to absorb any information without him expressly telling you how to interpret it and how you should view it).

Why he thinks it’s so necessary to be so blatantly biased with a regime almost no one needs any help to dislike, is a mystery. I think in his head, this book makes him look like some sort of vengeful crusader. It really just makes him look like an insecure journalist with a terminal case of self important arrogance.

There are plenty of books which fairly criticize the Soviet regime and it’s abuses fairly and in detail, it’s not a difficult task. When they do it in this way, there is much more weight to their crimes, because they remain human, even if they have done very evil things. But remnick deals solely in angels and demons.

If you want useful information you can use to draw your own conclusions, a coherent narrative, or some intellectual stimulation, look elsewhere.

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A general feeling.

This book gives less of a framework of the collapse, and more a sense or feeling of the emotion behind it.

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Heartbreaking, riveting

One of those books that makes you want to urge — no, command —your friends, "Stop whatever you're reading and pick up this book!" Cannot recommend this book highly enough. It earned its 1994 Pulitzer and its plentiful accolades. The performance fits the quality of the reporting: energetic and rich.

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Amazing

The depth and insight of this book are outstanding. Being a history buff I love when I become engrossed in content that I knew a bit about, but then learn much more. Excellent resource.

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There's a lot to learn from the Russian experience

A remarkable journey through a period and region that is shrouded in mystery and misinformation. Russia's ambitions and motivations are unknown by most westerners and it's simultaneously perplexing and terrifying to realize that a combination of apathy, cynicism and callous may render many Russians with a similar position.

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  • Fat Tony
  • 06-24-18

Great content, good speaker.

the audio quality is not great.

the speaker is good and the book is fantastic.

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  • Kieran Power
  • 04-07-18

Brilliant

Fantastically researched, brilliant and engaging, could not stop listening to this audio book. Very finely narrated. Could not recommend enough.

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  • Shane
  • 05-30-16

Fascinating Topic Well Told

This book was phenomenal. It did a really good job of telling the story though the eyes of a reporter who was there, constantly weaving in personal anecdotes with societal events. The protagonist (the author) clearly has a few bones to pick with the USSR government (as he should) but still manages to be remarkably objective given that this was written so close to the historical events it describes.