Kill Anything That Moves

The Real American War in Vietnam
Narrated by: Don Lee
Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
Categories: History, Military
4.5 out of 5 stars (173 ratings)

Audible membership

$14.95 a month

Free with a 30-day trial
1 audiobook of your choice.
A monthly selection of Audible Originals.
$14.95 a month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $24.95

Buy for $24.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Americans have long been taught that events such as the notorious My Lai massacre were "isolated incidents" in the Vietnam War, carried out by a few "bad apples." However, as award-winning journalist and historian Nick Turse demonstrates in this pioneering investigation, violence against Vietnamese civilians was not at all exceptional. Rather, it was pervasive and systematic, the predictable consequence of official orders to "kill anything that moves."

Drawing on a decade of research into secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, Turse reveals the policies and actions that resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded. He lays out in shocking detail the workings of a military machine that made crimes all but inevitable.

Kill Anything That Moves finally brings us face-to-face with the truth of a war that haunts America to this day.

©2013 Nick Turse. Recorded by arrangement with Metropolitan Books, an imprint of Henry Holt and Company, LLC. All rights reserved. (P)2013 HighBridge Company.

Critic Reviews

"A powerful case.... With superb narrative skill, he spotlights a troubling question: Why, with all the evidence collected by the military at the time of the war, were atrocities not prosecuted?" ( Washington Post)
"A comprehensive picture, written with mastery and dignity, of what American forces actually were doing in Vietnam. A convincing, inescapable portrait of this war - a portrait that, as an American, you do not wish to see; that, having seen, you wish you could forget, but that you should not forget." ( The Nation)
"Nick Turse's explosive, groundbreaking reporting uncovers the horrifying truth." ( Vanity Fair)

What listeners say about Kill Anything That Moves

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    112
  • 4 Stars
    36
  • 3 Stars
    14
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    9
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    89
  • 4 Stars
    36
  • 3 Stars
    14
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    6
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    108
  • 4 Stars
    18
  • 3 Stars
    17
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    7

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A book that shakes you to your core

Essential, gripping listening for those interested in US military/Cold war history. It was difficult for me to listen for more then 20 minutes at a time because the revelations were so gruesome, the described US policy incomprehensibly cruel, and the US military's failure to bring wrongdoers to justice maddening. This is an unforgettable book.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Game-changer!

Difficult read at some points, as the author goes into detail when describing war crimes. However, it certainly held my attention, made my stomach turn and changed my perspective on the Vietnam Conflict. That's what a good book's supposed to do. Worth a read for sure!

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Important but very difficult to listen to

This is one of the most viscerally wrenching books I've come across. Every minute seems to bring a new horror that probably won't leave me for a while. The only book I could compare it to would be Richard Evans' history "The Third Reich at War", with the caveat that many of the atrocities in this book were meticulously swept under the rug, with maddeningly few perpetrators brought to justice. What's maybe most shocking is that many of these atrocities were detailed in internal Pentagon documents.

It's an amazing act of restraint that Turse never uses the word 'genocide', but what's described in this book certainly fits the bill. Americans like myself would like to believe that acts of pure barbarism are caused by other people from less sophisticated places, but the unrelenting details of this book show how far from the truth that is. For that reason, I'd say this is one of the most important books on the Vietnam war I've come across.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Worldview shattering good

A grim, truthfully and overlooked accounting of the war crimes and atrocities committed by the US military in Vietnam. The book makes the point that we look at the war with rose colored glasses and often ignore the absolute abhorrent, regular and catastrophic behavior of the US military

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Should be required reading

Reading or listening to this book should be a prerequisite for obtaining a high school degree.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

interesting

the book had me thinking about things I hadn't thought about in a while in a way I thought about them in a while.

war, what's it good for?

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

essential read/listen

8 hours of american war crimes. Tough to get through but very important to understand.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Interesting history

Great history of how the Vietnam War was fought and how the truth of this war was kept from the American public. The death of the concept of American exceptionalism.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A lot I didn't know...

Many stories that uncover what really went on during the Vietnam war. I still stand behind our armed forces as they protect our country and all is far in war, but this book shows just how brutal man kind is and how gruesome and ruthless war is.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Disgraceful but factual account of Vietnam

As a guy who grew up in the sixties and joined the Army in the seventies, I thought I understood our history in Vietnam. Lt. William Calley of My Lai wasn't just a news story, his mother was my school nurse. Also, I study history as my primary topic of reading. Yet with that mindset I was as blind to the war crimes our own men routinely committed.

While the book was eye opening, the narration was horrid. As I've said I grew up with Vietnam on the news every night and you learned how to pronounce names of places like Da Nang which the narrator massacred. At first I was impressed with the pronunciation of the litany of Vietnamese names in the book but after hearing repeated bad city names I began to wonder. However it was a very English word the narrator should be able to pronounce if he intends on narrating a book about warfare. The word noncombatants was never pronounced properly. It was pronounced as "non com bet ants" instead of "non con bat ants". Anyone with middle school English ought to know the root word of noncombatants is combat.

Pronunciation wasn't the only problem. The narrator read about the brutal acts in th his book like he was reading the classified section of a newspaper. There was no emotion or intonation imparted to the text. This book contains atrocities that revival nearly the worst I can imagine, in fact only Hilter sounds worse. However I got the impression the reader was "phoning it in".

1 person found this helpful