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Publisher's Summary

A Reese's Book Club x Hello Sunshine book pick.

The New York Times best seller.

'This book is my story about growing up in a Black girl's body. It's about surviving in a world not made for me.'

Austin Channing Brown's first encounter with a racialised America came at age seven, when she discovered her parents named her Austin to deceive future employers into thinking she was a white man. Growing up in majority-white schools and churches, Austin writes, 'I had to learn what it means to love Blackness', a journey that led to a lifetime spent navigating America's racial divide as a writer, speaker and expert helping organisations practice genuine inclusion. 

In a time when nearly every institution (schools, churches, universities, businesses) claims to value diversity in its mission statement, Austin writes in breathtaking detail about her journey to self-worth and the pitfalls that kill our attempts at racial justice. Her stories bear witness to the complexity of America's social fabric and invite the listener to confront apathy, recognise God's ongoing work in the world and discover how Blackness - if we let it - can save us all.

©2020 Austin Channing Brown (P)2020 Hachette Audio UK

Critic Reviews

"Austin Channing Brown introduces herself as a master memoirist. This book will break open hearts and minds. It's an example of how one woman can change the world by telling the truth about her life with unflinching, relentless courage." (Glennon Doyle)

"Most people say, "that books has legs"; I measure the impact of a book by how often I throw it across the room. [Austin's book] has serious wings. It broke me open." (Brene Brown)

"A leading new voice on racial justice" (LAYLA SAAD, author of ME AND WHITE SUPREMACY)

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What listeners say about I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness

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  • Jo the Psychologist
  • 06-20-21

This is essential reading for white people.

Thank you Austin for writing this book. It was a privilege to read the story of your life. I'm working hard to try and be better and do more in my anti-racism work and this book has been an important part of my ongoing journey.

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  • Red Mitchell
  • 04-03-21

Taking stock

Great listen. Whenever you want to understand anything it's always best to go to researched unbiased work. This might be deemed biased because of the author but her research can be validated. It really helped me to take stock of things I didn't feel comfortable looking at for many reasons...

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  • Anonymous User
  • 01-09-21

Race, Struggles, and Christianity Mix

This story has a beautiful mix of struggles, race issues, and Christianity. Although this book is very grounded in Mrs. Brown's life experience, some of her experiences can be applied to others who are not of African descent. Which is great and amazing how even within her book she still tried to mention other minorities, like the Inidian woman example. It was so interesting how she kept coming back to God and the struggles of Jesus because it wasn't what I expected and loved it. I remember being a young teen and hearing about young African American students who went on a try to a plantation, hopeing to hear of the life of African enslaved peoples. But instead ended up picking cotton, young black kids picking cotton is disgusting. I loved hearing Mrs. Brown's voice throughout this because it make everything seem so much more human than if I read it on a page. I loved this 10/10, will purchase a hard copy for myself.