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Publisher's Summary

In the tradition of The Power of Habit and Thinking, Fast and Slow comes a practical, playful, and endlessly fascinating guide to what we really know about learning and memory today - and how we can apply it to our own lives.

From an early age, it is drilled into our heads: Restlessness, distraction, and ignorance are the enemies of success. We’re told that learning is all self-discipline, that we must confine ourselves to designated study areas, turn off the music, and maintain a strict ritual if we want to ace that test, memorize that presentation, or nail that piano recital.

But what if almost everything we were told about learning is wrong? And what if there was a way to achieve more with less effort?

In How We Learn, award-winning science reporter Benedict Carey sifts through decades of education research and landmark studies to uncover the truth about how our brains absorb and retain information. What he discovers is that, from the moment we are born, we are all learning quickly, efficiently, and automatically; but in our zeal to systematize the process we have ignored valuable, naturally enjoyable learning tools like forgetting, sleeping, and daydreaming. Is a dedicated desk in a quiet room really the best way to study? Can altering your routine improve your recall? Are there times when distraction is good? Is repetition necessary? Carey’s search for answers to these questions yields a wealth of strategies that make learning more a part of our everyday lives - and less of a chore.

By road testing many of the counterintuitive techniques described in this book, Carey shows how we can flex the neural muscles that make deep learning possible. Along the way he reveals why teachers should give final exams on the first day of class, why it’s wise to interleave subjects and concepts when learning any new skill, and when it’s smarter to stay up late prepping for that presentation than to rise early for one last cram session. And if this requires some suspension of disbelief, that’s because the research defies what we’ve been told, throughout our lives, about how best to learn.

The brain is not like a muscle, at least not in any straightforward sense. It is something else altogether, sensitive to mood, to timing, to circadian rhythms, as well as to location and environment. It doesn’t take orders well, to put it mildly. If the brain is a learning machine, then it is an eccentric one. In How We Learn, Benedict Carey shows us how to exploit its quirks to our advantage.

©2014 Benedict Carey (P)2014 Audible Studios

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  • Marcus
  • 01-12-15

A practical primer on the latest in learning

I use the lessons I learned here with my children, my own learning and with my clients in my training business because they work. Good book, snappy writing style so the content is never dry. If you've got children facing exams the sooner they learn these tactics the better. Half the work for 35% higher performance on the hardest questions is a good result in anyone's book

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

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  • Ms A A
  • 05-25-15

Very informative

Great book that challenges the assumptions we have about how we learn. I have lots of new strategies!

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • R. Newton
  • 04-30-15

Excellent book. Wish I had read it before studying

This book should be essential reading for every person before they begin a period of study. It is also a book that would be valuable for trainers and teachers alike.
I now know why working hard for long hours did not pay off!
I love this book. It will make a big difference to how I learn in the future.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Vernon
  • 07-12-16

A very worthwhile listen

I would highly recommend that anyone interested in learning listen to this book. There are lots of non obvious aspects to how learning works.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Patrik Karlsson
  • 07-19-15

It really delivered on the title

I liked most of the anecdotes, but loved all of the summary at the end.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Richard D
  • 07-08-15

Fantastic practical science

Really enjoyed this book, it's read by an entertaining and engaging speaker and the content is both interesting and practical for real life. In fact I now plan to write down the major points of the book and try to use them next time I am learning something new. Recommended.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Lazza
  • 07-03-15

Intriguing

I was looking for something to help with my studies. Its more of a insight to the functions and nuances of how our minds pick up outside stimulus and commits it to memory in a whole colour of sensory and emotional storage! Intriguing.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Urnss
  • 08-28-16

EVERY TEACHER SHOULD READ THIS

Whilst it doesn't give you the answers to revision techniques directly nor does it give you the latest bit of pedagogy to use in your next observation; it does change your understanding and outlook on how we learn.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • simon daniels
  • 10-17-18

ideas on improving learning

it's a good book if a little overbearing. You'll be able to spot pattern in your own learning styles and glean tips on how to take the pressure off your learning.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 09-26-18

Great

This is a fantastic book to improve your learning and get rid of false ideas about the subject.

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  • Lachie182
  • 12-28-16

Informative Review of Uncommon Learning Research

Very interesting book and a great listen. I listened to it whilst reading the book and found the two went hand in hand. The book looks at Learning Research that is unorthodox and goes against common sense. It forces you to rethink what you know about learning and gives you some new techniques to try. The Audio was well read and kept me interested

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Daniel
  • 04-09-18

Fantastic!!

Best book on education to date. Great ideas expressed clearly and logically. Well read also