Regular price: $27.97

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

The Nazi fascination with the occult is legendary, yet today it is often dismissed as Himmler's personal obsession or wildly overstated for its novelty. Preposterous though it was, however, supernatural thinking was inextricable from the Nazi project. The regime enlisted astrology and the paranormal, paganism, Indo-Aryan mythology, witchcraft, miracle weapons, and the lost kingdom of Atlantis in reimagining German politics and society and recasting German science and religion. In this eye-opening history, Eric Kurlander reveals how the Third Reich's relationship to the supernatural was far from straightforward. Even as popular occultism and superstition were intermittently rooted out, suppressed, and outlawed, the Nazis drew upon a wide variety of occult practices and esoteric sciences to gain power, shape propaganda and policy, and pursue their dreams of racial utopia and empire.

©2017 Eric Kurlander (P)2017 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

More from the same

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    22
  • 4 Stars
    15
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    4

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    26
  • 4 Stars
    8
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    21
  • 4 Stars
    10
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    5
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

sobering

a fascinating account of the Third reich's involvement with the bizarre and the demonic that was both sober and sobering.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Fascinating information.

This book provides an interesting view of just how much the occult was not only a part of Nazi Germany, but one of the primary causes of Germans being succeptable to being lured, and then pressed into participating in such horrific events. It should be a warning to every other nation that begins to abandon it's values, and accepts the occult.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Highly Academic, yet intiguing.

There have been so many wild theories put forth over the years about the link between the Occult and the Nazis. Eric Kurlander, an accomplished academic and historian, sets out to explore what exactly the truth about all of this is. In order to do so, he is forced to explain the nature of many different fringe movements and beliefs of the time that impacted the thirty-three percent of the German population that the Nazis reportedly used to ride their way to power. (This is, in fact, a frightening tale that parallels some of the recent political changes in the United States, and thus proves that you only need a unified minority of the populace to gain the power of any nation.) The difficulty with this approach is that the first third of the book is pretty dry and cerebral, but crucial to understanding the basis and full depth of some of the entertaining and intriguing, yet arguably kooky, myths and propaganda that the Nazis used to keep their followers aligned and motivated. Naturally, there are some interesting characters that arise from all of this. Likewise, it depicts a group of Nazi leaders who were constantly having to alter their approach to handling their followers rather than the other way around. This does not make them sympathetic, but makes it pretty clear that those in charge were pursuing power for the sake of power rather than having a more mystical agenda; though there were those in the power structure, including Hitler himself, who turned out to have some rather bizarre interests and beliefs that are not only surprising, but entertaining.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great scholarship, poor reader

If you could sum up Hitler’s Monsters in three words, what would they be?

Scholarly, balanced, well-researched

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Grover Gardner?

I wish that the production company had chosen *any* reader who is capable of pronouncing German words correctly. Ignorance of foreign languages is a widespread problem in audiobooks. Since I study German literature, I am always pleased to find audiobooks relating to my interests, but I have rarely, if ever, found a reader who actually knows how to pronounce German words in a way that doesn't make me cringe. If the book is about German subject matter, and uses a large number of German words and names, pick a reader who knows at least the basic rules of German pronunciation!

Any additional comments?

Excellent scholarly treatment of the issues surrounding the supernatural and border science in the Third Reich. I am a professor of German literature, and have done some research on occultism, parapsychology, and related phenomena, so I was eager to read this book, and pleased to find it in audiobook format (despite my dissatisfaction with the reader). Kurlander offers a well-researched account of the topic that draws deeply on primary sources, as well as addressing theoretical and historical work on related topics by other leading scholars. I would love to see more audiobooks of scholarly works like this, as opposed to the popular histories that are more common in audio format.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Written like a term paper by a student wanting to impress

A potentially fascinating subject rendered into a dull intellectual dissertation meandering intolerably on into painful disinterest.

4 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

University History Book Boring and Self Serving

What disappointed you about Hitler’s Monsters?

I had to stop listening to this book, as hard as I tried to get through it , because it reads like a University history . A professor you is required to write a book , and saturates the story with superflous words and irrelevant detail, and self serving commentary.

What was most disappointing about Eric Kurlander’s story?

Authors self serving narrative.

What didn’t you like about Grover Gardner’s performance?

He is a good narrator

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Hitler’s Monsters?

focus on story and back off the meaningless verbiage

Any additional comments?

Cant listen to any longer Will try to get refund.

4 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • PAUL
  • show low, az...usa
  • 08-04-17

One of the worst books I have ever read

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

G.O.K...(God Only Knows)...very difficult book to listen to...can't believe there is someone who would enjoy this book.

Has Hitler’s Monsters turned you off from other books in this genre?

No...but I'll be more careful in the future in choosing my books.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Grover Gardner is one of the best...I'm still in awe that he could go from start to finish

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

Yes...it would make a great starter for a fire in the hearth

Any additional comments?

As stated in most of my reviews...I walk a great deal...3 to 10 miles a day....the books I buy are in general, history books and books that have a read time of usually +20 hours...If I walk 2 hours a day...that will have me listening to a book for about 10 to 12 days....this book made walking an ordeal...listening to it as you walk made each mile seem like 2....last comment...TERRIBLE...repeat...ONE OF THE WORST BOOKS I HAVE READ.....

7 of 17 people found this review helpful