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Editorial Reviews

Editors Select, February 2017 - This book was a major unexpected delight for me. I've always been intrigued by plagues but usually just in the realm of sci-fi. I wasn't sure if a nonfiction book on the subject could really hook me. However, in Get Well Soon, author Jennifer Wright presents a whimsical, fascinating, and often hilarious exploration of an otherwise grim topic. Combining history, sociology, and science, she traces some of the most horrific plagues in human history from their origins to their eventual cures. Throughout each narrative, Wright peppers in fun facts - such as the belief that filling your house with onions could stave off the plague - while paying full respect to the victims of these illnesses. Gabra Zackman gives a downright masterful performance, perfectly delivering both the somber facts and wry humor. If you're a fan of Mary Roach or, like me, have even just a passing interest in the topic, don't hesitate to give this one a try. —Sam, Audible Editor

Publisher's Summary

A witty, irreverent tour of history's worst plagues - from the Antonine Plague, to leprosy, to polio - and a celebration of the heroes who fought them.

In 1518, in a small town in Alsace, Frau Troffea began dancing and didn't stop. She danced until she was carried away six days later, and soon 34 more villagers joined her. Then more. In a month more than 400 people had been stricken by the mysterious dancing plague. In late-19th-century England an eccentric gentleman founded the No Nose Club in his gracious townhome - a social club for those who had lost their noses, and other body parts, to the plague of syphilis for which there was then no cure. And in turn-of-the-century New York, an Irish cook caused two lethal outbreaks of typhoid fever, a case that transformed her into the notorious Typhoid Mary.

Throughout time, humans have been terrified and fascinated by the diseases history and circumstance have dropped on them. Some of their responses to those outbreaks are almost too strange to believe in hindsight. Get Well Soon delivers the gruesome, morbid details of some of the worst plagues we've suffered as a species, as well as stories of the heroic figures who selflessly fought to ease the suffering of their fellow man. With her signature mix of in-depth research and storytelling, and not a little dark humor, Jennifer Wright explores history's most gripping and deadly outbreaks, and ultimately looks at the surprising ways they've shaped history and humanity for almost as long as anyone can remember.

©2017 Jennifer Wright (P)2017 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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Didn't know syphilis could be so fascinating.

This book was definitely worth the credit.
I learned a lot of interesting facts that I hadn't been aware of before listening to this book.
I had a pretty good grasp and was fairly well informed about some of these topics in this book but still managed to learn new things even from those.
I like the way she managed to talk about these things in a somewhat lighthearted yet not irreverent way.
Of course with the book being less than eight hours in length you were not going to get an in-depth study of any of the topics covered by the author.
For most people though, I think this book would be very informative and quite adequate for someone who would just like to broaden their knowledge of these historical events.
I actually did find the section about syphilis quite fascinating.
Of course not the disease itself but some of the attempts at helping those individuals to try and live a more normal life.
It is odd how some of these epidemics brought out the best in people and others, not so much.
I think the narrator was perfect for this book as well.
I have not listen to any of her narration before but thought that she was very good.

52 of 54 people found this review helpful

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Such A Great Surprise

I never thought I would be so absorbed by a book about this subject matter. I rarely ever read non fiction. So this was a risky purchase for me. Boy did I have nothing to worry about! I sat in the car in my driveway just to keep listening. Ran late leaving for work because I was lost in it. It's also quite funny at many moments. Just such a great surprise.

55 of 58 people found this review helpful

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Highly informative with a humorous twist

Any additional comments?

As a physician, I found the book informative and fascinating. The book was medically accurate, although a little simplistic in places. The background story of the individuals involved added to the medical data presented. Wright's very dry sense of humor was genuinely funny and entertaining. The only problem was the narration. The reader had frequent bursts of too rapid reading, with a nasal tone. It was actually difficult to understand during some of the hurried segments. Overall though I would still highly recommend the volume to medical and non-medical persons alike.

39 of 42 people found this review helpful

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Fascinating read for anyone interested in the history of human behavior in response to fear

This book is 100% entertaining, especially in audio format. I work in public health and laughed out loud many times at the author's dark sense of humor so clearly emitted from a place of compassion and empathy for all those courageous, cowering, brilliant and simple souls that have gone before us.

36 of 40 people found this review helpful

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Excellent

This is an interesting, well-narrated book. The author managed to impart a great deal of information in a very effective way. I enjoyed listening to it!

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Enjoyable

I purchased this book thinking it would get a bit more into the science but that's not what it does. Still, it was enjoyable hearing about the various maladies and the outcomes. The reader is fantastic.

23 of 26 people found this review helpful

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Who knew?!

I bought this book as a daily deal and found I really enjoyed it despite the grim title. I liked the authors sense of humor and I enjoyed the narrator as well. I learned a few things along the way and enjoyed the different aspects of each disease she spoke of. Political, social , scientific , a little bit of everything .

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Tina
  • ALLSTON, MA, United States
  • 08-06-17

Witty an Smart

This book is awesome. one of few books I've ever listened to all in one sitting (road trip)
It is really well written, witty, relevant, and we'll researched.
The narrator is clear, has a good command of the humor, and a good reading pace.
I absolutely recommend it!!!

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Jan
  • LAGRANGE, KY, United States
  • 07-09-17

This book made me sick (in a really great way)

What made the experience of listening to Get Well Soon the most enjoyable?

Jennifer Wright is both a brilliant person and a very funny one. Only a great writer could find humor in and bring humor to plagues, epidemics, and some of the people associated with them. She also reserves great admiration for the heroes of modern epidemiology and disease control- people like Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin and thousands of unrecognized men and women who doing fieldwork in hot zones all over the world.She does not reserve her scorn for those who blocked progress in the area of prevention.Her writing is scientific, accurate,approachable, and sometimes snarky and sarcastic.She had me at the first microbe.

Who was your favorite character and why?

President Roosevelt, Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin who together brought the fight against polio to a victory. President Roosevelt and his Warm Springs Foundation created not only a therapeutic respite for polio patients but he supported fundraising efforts to provide the research dollars needed. Dr. Salk, who refused to patent his vaccine saying it belonged to the world and Dr Sabin who developed a lifelong vaccine with an easier administration method-all heroes. At this time through the efforts and funds provided by Rotary International and the WHO polio is close to eradication in the environment.There are many others who get shout-outs from Wright along the way and a few who get condemnation such as the "Lobotomy King" Walter Freeman who stole people's personalities and lives with his icepick lobotomies.

Which character – as performed by Gabra Zackman – was your favorite?

Roosevelt, Salk and Sabin stand tall in my pantheon not only for their brilliance but also for there selflessness.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Either-You'll be glad you weren't alive for most of this stuff or thank a public health officer every day

Any additional comments?

What a wonderful narrator is Gabra Zackman-she handles scientific words and names and really disgusting disease descriptions with aplomb. She also communicates the author's witty, sometimes snarky style so well. Considering the subject manner, a light touch is often a welcomed relief.

13 of 15 people found this review helpful

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bookgirl

Science for the masses. Informative, interesting and fun. We take for granted so many of the medical advances of the last 75 years. Excellent narration.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful