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Publisher's Summary

With its uncanny night howls, unrivaled ingenuity, and amazing resilience, the coyote is the stuff of legends. In Indian folktales it often appears as a deceptive trickster or a sly genius. But legends don't come close to capturing the incredible survival story of the coyote.

As soon as Americans - especially white Americans - began ranching and herding in the West, they began working to destroy the coyote. Despite campaigns of annihilation employing poisons, gases, helicopters, and engineered epidemics, coyotes didn't just survive, they thrived, expanding across the continent from Anchorage, Alaska, to New York's Central Park. In the war between humans and coyotes, coyotes have won hands down.

Coyote America is both an environmental and a deep natural history of the coyote. It traces both the five-million-year-long biological story of an animal that has become the "wolf" in our backyards and its cultural evolution from a preeminent spot in Native American religions to the hapless foil of the Road Runner. A deeply American tale, the story of the coyote in the American West and beyond is a sort of Manifest Destiny in reverse, with a pioneering hero whose career holds up an uncanny mirror to the successes and failures of American expansionism.

An illuminating biography of this extraordinary animal, Coyote America isn't just the story of an animal's survival - it is one of the great epics of our time.

©2016 Dan Flores (P)2016 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Very Enjoyable Book, Subject Matter, and Reader

I approve of this audiobook. I basically listened to it due to the fact that there isn't a mammal alive that I dislike to the degree that I dislike canis latrans (still bitter about the loss of my childhood pets thanks to them) and I wanted to know more about them and hopefully develop some empathy. This book did that. Flores is a gifted author and audiobook reader a damned fine reader.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Coyote Consciousness

My intrigue about this book came from listening to the author's interview with Joe Rogan. As a great fan of Wiley Coyote, and having had several run-ins with coyotes throughout California, this book gave context to my mysterious fascination with them. It's a different kind of wisdom, and a non-linear logic that I really appreciate. The stories and factoids in Coyote America are remarkable, and I've already recommended this book to my trickster friends and family. A great read for long drives.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Good book. It's exactly what you would expect.

I had heard of this book from Joe Rogan Podcast, and Steve Rinella's Meat Eater. The book was informative without being too dry and scholarly to digest. I truly recommend it to anyone with even a passing interest in Coyotes, hunting, and the origin of coyote folklore.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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informative and eye opening to certain issues

The book is overall good and the narrator does a great job. BUT


The author is contradictory, and political ("liberal") in his opinions. Praises Walt Disney and Bambi multiple times. He seems more like an animal rights activist trying to convince others of the value of Coyotes through a rose colored filter. I think mass murder and poisoning of Coyotes is wrong too, but this goes past that a little.

He (the author) tries very hard to anthropomorphize and romanticize coyotes. He stretches comparisons between humans and coyotes to a nauseating degree.

Where there is one fact regarding coyotes, there are five anecdotes, stories or description of a Walt Disney movie that inspired him to animal rights.

Having said that, I did appreciate learning of the poisons campaigns of our forefathers and their errors. I understand the need to learn from the past. I didn't estimate the amount of fluff and feel pieces that would be included I suppose.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Super Interesting

A good mix of natural history and our role in the North American ecosystem. Interspersed with reflections and observations about our nature.
Didn't love the cadence of the reader but nothing to turn you away.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Intelligence, Adaptability, and Persistence

I found this book absorbing in its description of our wonderful, fascinating native critter, the coyote--its evolution, ability to adapt and survive, and its incredible intelligence. Our attempts to totally destroy this animal, to wipe it completely from the face of the earth, with unbelievably horrendous poisons and other unspeakable methods make me deeply ashamed. It was engaging to read about the coyote, but almost impossible to read about what the government, in our name, has done to kill it.

But the coyote has continued to thrive and increase its range into our cities and suburbs. The author tells us how to live with this wild creature in our midst, to avoid contact but to simply enjoy occasional sightings of something from our wild past that is with us in spite of our efforts to remove it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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fascinating content

The content was very engaging and interesting, but the information was presented in a somewhat disorderly fashion. I felt that the author jumped around a bit too much for a better rating, which took away from the enjoyment of the book. I commend the author however for the amount of information present in the book. He is clearly very engaged in the topic.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Park Ranger learns much!

This book is a wonderful balance of story and facts that keeps you wanting more. I am a Park Ranger and can’t wait to use some of this material in Programs for the public. I wish there was more folklore, but I think I can find separate books on that. This book inspired me to learn more and better connect to our natural neighbors.

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Good book

it was a good book. I'm looking forward to listening to American Serengeti next. I heard Dan Flores on Steven Rinella's podcast and checked out the book. It didn't disappoint

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Covers a Lot of Interesting Ground

Narration was good, the coverage was broad - from nature to science to politics, and from wolves to ranchers to their new urban haunts. Many good anecdotes. I didn't know what to expect - I purchased the audio book for two reasons: 1.) as a relief from just listening to the new quantum loop gravity theory, and I received said relief; and 2.) I purchased it to enhance my grasp of reality, which has a direct bearing on the quality of my new philosophy.

The book kept me interested all the way through. It did three things to me: 1.) it made me want to get more books that contain in-depth studies of specific animals (though I've listened to many already); 2.) it made me want to vote Democrat (that actually went through my head) (but I'll go for enlightening the world instead); and 3.) it made me more aware of existing nature.

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Profile Image for Coyote Noir
  • Coyote Noir
  • 07-03-17

Coyote America

Absolutely loved this book. A fascinating insight into coyotes and our interactions with them throughout history. In addition, it was wonderfully narrated, I highly recommend it to anyone with an interest in natural history, and human-carnivore/opportunist interactions.