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Go the Way Your Blood Beats

On Truth, Bisexuality and Desire
Narrated by: Harrison Knights
Length: 3 hrs and 27 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (6 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Using bisexuality as a frame, Go the Way Your Blood Beats questions the division of sexuality into straight and gay, in a timely exploration of the complex histories and psychologies of human desire. A challenge to the idea that sexuality can either ever be fully known or neatly categorised, it is a meditation on desire's unknowability. 

Interwoven with anonymous addresses to past loves - the sex of whom remain obscure - the book demonstrates the universalism of human desire. Part essay, part memoir, part love letter, Go the Way Your Blood Beats asks us to see desire and sexuality as analogous with art - a mysterious, creative force.

©2018 Michael Amherst (P)2018 Audible, Ltd

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Complex and insightful

This lays it bare and I am surprised it hasn' t won multiple awards for its message. The style and speed of the narrative takes a little getting used to, but the logic is incisive. You will need to listen more than once to get it all.

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This audio needs more attention!

To me this was one of those instances when you find a book you didn't know you were looking for, but once you find it, you fall in love.

Really interesting discussion about the language and the boundaries of the categories we use to think about ourselves, our sexualities and our experiences. It gave words to many thoughts of mine that I've been mulling over and made me reconsider other things. The narrator worked perfectly, his voice was soft and tempered, very enjoyable to listen to, he worked great for both the essay like parts as well as the short but intimate remembrances of lovers that are scattered all through the book (which are beautifully written in second person and they add a poetic touch to what could have been just an academic essay. Love them).

I just finished it, but I need to listen to it again a couple of times to write down many ideas that I want to keep with me.