• Gay Rights and the Mormon Church

  • Intended Actions, Unintended Consequences
  • By: Gregory A. Prince
  • Narrated by: Bill Odman
  • Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: LGBTQ+, LGBTQ+ Studies
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (6 ratings)
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Publisher's Summary

The Mormon Church entered the public square on LGBT issues by joining forces with traditional marriage proponents in Hawaii in 1993. Since then, the church has been a significant player in the ongoing saga of LGBT rights within the United States and at times has carried decisive political clout.

Gregory Prince draws from over 50,000 pages of public records, private documents, and interview transcripts to capture the past half century of the Mormon Church’s attitudes on homosexuality. Initially, that principally involved only its own members, but with its entry into the Hawaiian political arena, the church signaled an intent to shape the outcome of the marriage equality battle. That involvement reached a peak in 2008 during California’s fight over Proposition 8, which many came to call the “Mormon Proposition".

In 2015, when the Supreme Court made marriage equality the law of the land, the Mormon Church turned its attention inward, declaring same-sex couples “apostates” and denying their children access to key Mormon rites of passage, including the blessing (christening) of infants and the baptism of children.

Check out YouTube videos on: Prince's interview with KUER, Prince's Q-Talk with Equality Utah, Prince's interview with the Press, and Prince's event with Benchmark Books.

©2019 University of Utah Press (P)2020 University of Utah Press

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Clear, concise reporting of a complex narrative

This book was difficult for me as a gay ex-mormon. I personally experienced the profound rejection, and the emotional, mental & spiritual torture so thoroughly described within it, and reliving those horrible experience was a painful opening of old wounds. Since making a clean break with the Mormon church four decades ago, I have considered that chapter of my life closed and have deliberately not paid any attention to the church since, especially regarding LGBTQ issues. I decided to listen to this book out of compassion for my family members who remain faithful believers, to try to gain an understanding of their changing perspectives over the years - from rejection and estrangement, to a tepid acceptance but a renewed warm familial affection (for which I am so grateful). This book has given me the look in to the church and the Mormon culture's history and changing attitudes that I was looking for. The insight Prince offers has helped me to understand the mindset and struggles my Mormon family has met along their religious journey, but more importantly, has confirmed in my heart and mind that my decision to break away from the LDS Church was the best thing I have ever done for my mental & spiritual wellbeing.

Kudos also to Mr Odman's precise, clear, and appropriately dispassionate reading of this difficult material. He never editorializes in inflection or interpretation, but rather presents the book as it is, and allows Prince's voice to be the prominent one.

1 person found this helpful