Fights on the Little Horn

Unveiling the Mysteries of Custer’s Last Stand
Narrated by: Joe Barrett
Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
Categories: History, American
4.5 out of 5 stars (6 ratings)

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

This remarkable book synthesizes a lifetime of in-depth research into one of America's most storied disasters, the defeat of Custer's 7th Cavalry at the hands of the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians, as well as the complete annihilation of that part of the cavalry led by Custer himself.  

The author, Gordon Harper, spent countless hours on the battlefield itself as well as researching every iota of evidence of the fight from both sides, white and Indian. He was, thus, able to recreate every step of the battle as authoritatively as anyone could, dispelling myths and falsehoods along the way. Harper himself passed away in 2009, leaving behind nearly two million words of original research and writing. In this book, his work has been condensed for the general public to observe his key findings and the crux of his narrative on the exact course of the battle.  

Though author Gordon Harper is no longer with us, his daughter Tori Harper, along with author/historians Gordon Richard and Monte Akers, have done yeoman's work in preserving his valuable research for the public.

©2014 Gordon Clinton Harper (P)2019 Tantor

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Not For Amateurs, But Extraordinary Reading

Finally, a book for those who think they know everything. Assuming you have a good understanding of the Battle and its men, you should find this book to be the most compellingly researched book of them all.
Lacking from the author are his judgments of the men (for the most part) that permeate every other narrative), and the repetitive conclusions similarly found in other writings. Most of those books are written by professional book writers whose goal is to get a new book out every 2-3 years. Here, the thoroughly refreshing and often totally new evidence is presented to the reader. It is for you alone to make the call. This is not a common motif found in most history books, and certainly not in the contentious world of Custer and the Big Horn. While the author obviously leans in his own direction, he does so without trying to force his conclusions upon the reader.
Until this book, my favorite book was “Son of the Morning Star”
by Evan Connell. I felt Connell did a terrific job as he dismantled old notions, and injected new information into the saga. His writing was impeccable. One would have thought that to be the final word.
That is until this book. In my opinion, having studied the Battle and visited the Battlefield many times over the past 30 or so years) is that this book’s findings put everything ever written into the minor leagues. Without the need to repeat already known facts as nauseam, the author actually THOUGHT about what he uncovered. He had the ability to look for evidence that many others wouldn’t dream of looking for and then focusing his extraordinarily acute mind upon his findings that convince me that he is correct. To repeat, he allows us to decide, but what he found at least left me convinced he was right.

Finally, another point to make that supports his work is that this book was not finished and published until long after he died. He was not in a rush to sell. His job seemed to be one of meticulous and thorough scholarship. Perhaps he didn’t care whether or not he made any money? It’s clear though that whatever he finally wrote passed his serious standards. He had so much more to write on the ancillary topics (Terry and Gibbons, for example) but did not live long enough. But I am so happy his family published this incredible work of rather revolutionary scholarship. It will be my go-to book on Custer from now on, unless or until his family finds more work of his to publish. It’s THAT good.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Good book but many names mispronounced

He calls Mitch Bouyer Mitch Bouyee and Daniel Kanipe Knipe. It's good work by the author but not the narrator in that regard.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Andrew
  • Andrew
  • 11-20-19

missing

this book gives fabulous history of the Reno and Bentine action but the main feature of the Custer fight is missing in action. I know there were no survivors on the soldiers side but there is plenty of Indian information that could be used to piece this action together. As usual these sources are distrusted or ignored. A shame this could have been a great book. Should be titled Reno and Bentine as this is the main focus of before during and after action.