• Fatal Discord

  • Erasmus, Luther, and the Fight for the Western Mind
  • By: Michael Massing
  • Narrated by: Tom Parks
  • Length: 34 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Release date: 02-27-18
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperAudio
  • 5 out of 5 stars (82 ratings)

Regular price: $53.61

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Publisher's Summary

A deeply textured dual biography and fascinating intellectual history that examines two of the greatest minds of European history - Desiderius Erasmus and Martin Luther - whose heated rivalry gave rise to two enduring, fundamental, and often colliding traditions of philosophical and religious thought. 

Erasmus of Rotterdam was the leading figure of the Northern Renaissance. At a time when Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael were revolutionizing Western art and culture, Erasmus was helping to transform Europe's intellectual and religious life, developing a new design for living for a continent rebelling against the hierarchical constraints of the Roman Church. When in 1516 he came out with a revised edition of the New Testament based on the original Greek, he was hailed as the prophet of a new enlightened age. Today, however, Erasmus is largely forgotten, and the reason can be summed up in two words: Martin Luther. As a young friar in remote Wittenberg, Luther was initially a great admirer of Erasmus and his critique of the Catholic Church, but while Erasmus sought to reform that institution from within, Luther wanted a more radical transformation. Eventually, the differences between them flared into a bitter rivalry, with each trying to win over Europe to his vision. 

In Fatal Discord, Michael Massing seeks to restore Erasmus to his proper place in the Western tradition. The conflict between him and Luther, he argues, forms a fault line in Western thinking - the moment when two enduring schools of thought, Christian humanism and evangelical Christianity, took shape. A seasoned journalist who has reported from many countries, Massing here travels back to the early 16th century to recover a long-neglected chapter of Western intellectual life, in which the introduction of new ways of reading the Bible set loose social and cultural forces that helped shatter the millennial unity of Christendom and whose echoes can still be heard today. Massing concludes that Europe has adopted a form of Erasmian humanism while America has been shaped by Luther-inspired individualism. 

©2018 Michael Massing (P)2018 HarperCollins Publishers

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Sustained Magnificence

Where does Fatal Discord rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Among the best

What was one of the most memorable moments of Fatal Discord?

As Luther defended his views of the Bible at the Diet of Worms, he declared in conclusion, "Here I stand. I cannot do otherwise." At least that's what we've always been told! Apparently, he actually concluded with, "Amen." But it's not as good of a story.

Which character – as performed by Tom Parks – was your favorite?

I enjoyed Erasmus the most, as his humanist vision was ahead of his time and he presented an appealing alternative to the rigid ideologies of the day that led so many Europeans to kill one another.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

While a very flawed person, the incredible, fearless courage Luther showed in his defiance of the Catholic Church was astonishing. He could have faced burning at the stake many times over; indeed, it is a fate numerous of his followers suffered. Yet the threat never caused him to moderate his unbridled attacks against the Church, showing both the courage of his convictions and the power that beliefs of whose truth one is utterly convinced can have over a person's actions.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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rich, and beautifully told

Where does Fatal Discord rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Right up there.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Luther. Massing does a wonderful job humanizing him, will all his (deep) flaws.

Any additional comments?

The juxtaposition of Luther and Erasmus is extremely effective in highlighting the importance of each.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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My first Audible book...and it was great!

I come to this book as a newbie to Audible and a once-upon-a-time Lutheran, i.e., spiritual but not pew-able, steeped in the traditions of Martin Luther. Always a student of history, I am no expert. I come from the educational philosophy that memorizing dates the names of battles and military conquests was learning history. (It was more “reciting” history.) This was a welcome change.

I don’t know that the author and narrator collaborated on the presentation of this book. After listening to it, I think they must be brothers from different mothers. The writing is wonderful. These are stories, not just histories. The narration complements the writing beautifully. As the chapters alternated perspectives between Erasmus and Luther, I was never at a loss to identify which was the focus. Indeed, it strikes me that someone smart could do a film version and walk off with an Oscar.

It’s verrrrrry long (almost 35 hours—a blessing not having to lug it around!), but it is written so that one can pick it up and have enough of a toe-hold to keep moving without losing ground. It’s not critical to keep track of all the names and dates. The story flows from an emphasis on the arguments of the day, the associated social and cultural phenomena, and the links that bring us to 2018.

I look forward to reading more Audible (no, I don’t work for Audible or anyone/thing affiliated) just to see if other selections can reach this level of excellence. There’s the challenge!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Really an amazing work

I had worried a bit about this title, given that the nature of the topic coupled with the length might produce something very abstruse, dry, or dependent upon a high degree of prior knowledge about the topic. I was very pleasantly surprised on all fronts, and would strongly recommend this to students of the late Renaissance/early Reformation.

One of the great things about this work is the degree of depth given to background information. If the topic at hand is St Augustine, St Jerome, St Thomas Aquinas, or the Apostle Paul, you need not be steeped in theology, because Massing covers these topics each in turn. Neither does this book suffer from a surplus of front-end loaded background of questionable relevance; the author meters out the background and brings it to review at the time which makes the most sense.

Part also of what places this so high in my estimation is the contrast with a biography of Thomas More I finished immediately afterward. While More was not a primary subject of this book, I felt I learned more useful information about him here than in the other biography, despite his role being marginal to this book.

Additionally, this author does a tremendous job of tying up loose ends afterward and drawing the past into the present. The reason I listen to things like this parallel biography of the Renaissance/Reformation is because I think it bears on the present, but the further back it is, the harder to trace the lines of descent. He does a great job in this. I suspect my politics and Massing's may differ, but the overall coverage was respectful and objective in its layout.

As to the narration, I truly don't remember it, and honestly that's the highest praise I can give: I don't listen to nonfiction audiobooks for the narration. I want to be able to hear you clearly and articulately, be able to listen and retain at high speed, and to have very few points of needing to skip back to understand what I just missed. Parks hits all of these marks perfectly. This was the first book he narrated that I've listened to, but would gladly see him read more of the works I have.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Read the last two chapters first

Excellent books about interesting men in interesting times. I would suggest reading the two afterwards first, however. They explain why Luther and Erasmus still matter.

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Erasmus, Martin Luther, and their Lives

This is a deep look into the of two important persons that have left their marks in the Church. From whatever view you have of these men and their works have had an impact on our world. This book explores their lives and touches on others around them. You get a better understanding of Erasmus and his context. You can see Erasmus place in the world was rocked by Luther raise. Their discord shaped the what came afterward.

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Excellent treatment of the subject

Well-researched, well-written, and well-read. Thoroughly enjoyed the audio book. May buy and read the print book. Highly recommended.

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Great!

Especially great if youre interested in the roots of our modern ideas, or to learn about all the people and deas that you vaguely remember from school.

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Martin Luther. Erasmus. Two titans of religion.

I knew about both of these guys, but after this,
I have more appreciation for these two. I grew to like Luther over the span of the book and realized I believe a lot he talked about. If you enjoy this type of book, get it! The narrator was great, he author put it together nicely. I especially enjoyed the colorful language these guys used especially ML. Highly recommended!

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Brilliant

This is an indispensable addition to any bookshelf on the German reformation and the Catholic response,