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FDR's Day of Infamy Speech

Length: 9 mins
Categories: History, American
5 out of 5 stars (18 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"Yesterday, December 7, 1941, a date which will live in infamy, the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan."

With those words, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt asked Congress to declare a state of war with Japan following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Hear FDR's classic speech as America first experienced it, with this historic live-radio broadcast.

©2006 Radio Spirits Inc. (P)2006 Radio Spirits Inc.

Critic Reviews

"As millions of Americans tuned in at home, the president sought to convey the seriousness of the situation and prepare the nation for the taxing job that lay ahead....'The Day of Infamy' speech attracted the largest audience in radio history, with over 81 percent of all American homes tuning in to seek guidance from the president." (Robert J. Brown, Manipulating the Ether: The Power of Broadcast Radio in Thirties America)

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Roosevelt's famous infamy speech

Narration: clear and classic.

Content: Every American should listen to this speech, which exemplifies how on solemn occasions the most persuasive, evocative speeches are those that are focused and which use simple, though not simplistic, language.

Stirring that the audience applauded a good long upon Roosevelt's arrival, as, of course, it did when roosevelt finished speaking.