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Publisher's Summary

A wealthy old man laid up in the hospital is desperate to understand the last months of his daughter's life before she was killed in a car crash in Mexico. It was puzzling. She'd cleaned out her considerable bank account, left Miami and hadn't been heard from again.

Travis McGee ventures into the steep hills and strange backwoods of Oaxaca through a bizarre world of dropouts, drug freaks, and kinky rich people - and begins to suspect the beautiful girl's death was no accident.

©1969 John D. MacDonald (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Mexico, Hippies and Murder

Travis and Meyer are in Mexico at the behest of a disabled businessman that Meyer knows in passing. They're mission; and they've decided to accept it, is to travel to Oaxaca and find out how things were for the man's dead daughter in the last year of her life. What they find is two men and two women being controlled and manipulated by a predator. One of those women is the man's daughter. The story of their time in Mexico is nothing that they can tell her father; so what to do? while they're attempting to discern their purpose Travis is used as a sex toy by an eccentric English woman. They make a local friend; one Enelio Fuentes who helps them with local matters and introduces them to a couple of beautiful sisters who are secretaries in one of Fuentes' family businesses in Guadalajara.
There is also a gay man named Bruce Bundy involved. MacDonald had a tolerant attitude towards gay men at least for the era but his extreme bias against lesbians; revealed in The Quick Red Fox is again on display in this work. Though it is done a great deal more subtly in this book than it was in that one it is still there. Despite the limitations inherent in a book created 45 years ago in a culture that is radically different the work stands up fairly well. As always where this author is concerned the plot, the characters and the pace of the book are all well done.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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A creepy view of the 1970s "Drug Culture"

In the early 70s I thought I was a hippie, but not like these folks. Perhaps there had to be some like these to supply the drugs that seemed to be everywhere at the time, but thank God I never met any. (That I know of!) I really enjoyed the vision of Mexico at the time though. It seems so strange to hear now that the "Mexican peso was rock-solid" and that American investors were lining up to invest in Mexico. This has to be one of my favorte Travis McGee adventures.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Darwin8u
  • Mesa, AZ, United States
  • 12-04-17

McGee in Oaxaca

"What a limited man believes is his emotional reality is indeed his emotional reality."
- John D. MacDonald, Dress Her in Indigo

This is an interesting story and it turns REALLY dark about 2/3 into it. Set mainly in Oaxaca, Mexico, it contains some of MacDonald's best descriptions. While MacDonald is skilled at describing the waters of Florida, there is only so many different ways you can describe sand, water, sunsets and islands. MacDonald goes all out on his trip to Mexico. And it is obvious that this book was written IN Mexico. It carries the color and the weight of Mexico in almost every page.

It was also published in 1969, so MacDonald is busy describing hippies who have flown down to Mexico to get high, check out, make love, make art, etc. But underneath it all there are also those who prey on those young Americans. MacDonald describes all the types and it is gnarly and ugly. Despite it being fiction, it does remind you that people have been doing ugly and ungodly things to each other for a long time.

One of the weaknesses of this book is McPhee's treatment of several of the gay characters. It isn't that they are bad. I'm OK with gay people being bad. Being evil even. However, I think McPhee tends to spend a bit too much time working through the whole gay preditor schtick. I keep on reminding myself that this was the late 60s and America had come a long way, but still was barely getting its feet wet with brown and black people.

I should probably admit, however, that I am on the MacDonald/Travis McGee bus until it gets to the final stop. There is always something to pick at in each of his books, but the scab is relatively small and the scars tend to be fascinating, and yet still grotesque, features.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

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The performance makes this series.

Travis McGee comes to life through the performance and isn't the same without the voice of Robert Petkoff.

An unusual story, sad and too close to reality.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Awesome story. Petkoff does an excellent job!

What made the experience of listening to Dress Her in Indigo the most enjoyable?

Great story and characters. And, Petkoff's ability to carry the dialog in the various accents

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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A particularly good one

One of the better-plotted stories, and a great setting in Oaxaca. Meyer is there throughout, which always gives good balance. Some unnecessarily sordid notes and some non-PC stances, of course, but all in all a good one. Fantastic voice performance, complete with Mexican, French and Midwestern accents.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Love Travis McGee

Would you consider the audio edition of Dress Her in Indigo to be better than the print version?

Haven't read the print version. Just love to be read to, while sewing, on road trips, while folding the laundry and walking the dog

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

You don't know till the very end who did it?? Keeps you thinking

What about Robert Petkoff’s performance did you like?

I started at book 1 and have now just finished Book 11 and I'm am enjoying Robert Petkoff.

At the beginning I was missing Darin McGavin but I am coming around.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Dress her and call her lost.

Another example of an excellent Travis McGee novel. Plenty of twists and turns. Several surprises. If you like Travis McGee, then you you must read this book.

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Classic<br />

I became fond of Travis McGee when I read these novels in the 80's. They are even better as an audio...