Dark Tide Rising

Narrated by: David Colacci
Series: William Monk, Book 24
Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (209 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

When a ransom exchange turns violent in the latest mystery from New York Times best-selling author Anne Perry, Commander William Monk faces an unthinkable possibility: betrayal by his own men. 

Local businessman Harry Exeter doesn't want the aid of the Thames River Police in tracking down the men who kidnapped his wife, Kate. He only asks them to help him navigate Jacob's Island, a creepy mass of decrepit buildings where he will hand off a large sum of money in exchange for her life. But when they arrive at the meeting place, Commander Monk and five of his best men are attacked from all sides, and Monk is left wondering who could have given away their plans - and why anyone would want to harm Kate Exeter. 

As Monk follows leads from Kate's worried cousin and a crafty clerk at the bank where Exeter gathered the ransom money, it seems inevitable one of his own men has betrayed him. Delving into their pasts, he realizes how little he knows about the people he works with every day, including his trusted right-hand man, Hooper, the one colleague Monk has always been certain he can count on. 

Even as they identify one of the kidnappers, the case runs into hurdle after hurdle, causing Monk to choose between his own safety and the chance to solve the case - and figure out where his men's loyalty really lies.

©2018 Anne Perry (P)2018 Recorded Books
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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Interesting

This is book number twenty-four of the William Monk Series. Monk is Commander of the Thames River Police. A wife of a wealthy developer is kidnapped. Attorney Sir Oliver Rathbone suggests Cmdr. Monk accompany him to pay the ransom. Monk picks 6 key men to accompany them to pay the ransom. Then, everything goes wrong.

The book is well written and the plot twists and turns as only Perry can do. I am disappointed that my favorite character, Hester, was not in her usual spot as a key player. We saw very little of Hester except near the end of the story. I do hope Perry brings Hester back as a key protagonist. I had a feeling that in the middle of the book Perry was using repetition as a filler. Overall, it is a good Victorian Mystery story.

The book is eleven hours and fifty-five minutes. David Colacci does an excellent job narrating the book. Colacci is one of my favorite narrators. Colacci is an actor and director. He is now a full-time audiobook narrator. He has won many Audiofile Earphone Awards, earned an Audi nomination and was included on the “Best of the Year” list by Publishers Weekly.

4 people found this helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

Don't waste your credit

I had forgotten how horrible the last book was until I finished chapter one. I was ready to return this book by chapter 4 but continued to listen. The story did get better but the ending was abrupt and disappointing. I am done with the Monk series.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Slow, repetitive, with an implausible and hasty end

I’ve noted a trend in ms Perry’s last several books to beat us to death with her protagonist’s (monk or Pitt) vacillations. In DTR, I almost abandoned the book because of this. Monk endless “Do I trust him? Yes, I trust him. Wait. Maybe I shouldn’t. Of course, I do. But....” drones on for hours, taking the place of any plot or character development. One wonders where the editor was.

The criminal is obvious from the start, the characters simply self flagellating and when the “answer” to the crime is finally revealed in standard Perry last minute courtroom scenes, is simply ridiculous. Hearsay wins the case. I’m still irritated thinking about it and I am not a particularly demanding reader.

I gave the story two stars over one because the character of Hooper was interesting.

The narrator did a good job with Perry’s dry and rather formal style— a style I’ve enjoyed in the past.

If I hadn’t recently finished the excellent Daniel Pitt series debut this book might have had me quitting Perry and searching for an historical mystery author that fills the pages with story, not boring redundancy.

2 people found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Not Perry’s best work

I’ve been a fan of both the Thomas Pitt and William Monk books from the beginning, but was disappointed by the last Pitt book and even more so by Dark Tide Rising. Monk and Sgt. Hooper, both experienced policemen, are blind and incompetent in this story, repeatedly failing to follow obvious lines of inquiry, but blithely blabbing the details of the case to key witnesses and potential suspects.

Toward the end of the book, Monk says, “...I can’t think how I could have been so gullible.” Maybe you could excuse Monk because of his distress over Hester’s recent abduction. But what about Hooper and the other police officers who were involved in the case?

Early on, Monk and Hooper decide that one of their own men must have betrayed them. I could think of several other explanations they should have investigated. Instead, Monk and Hooper spin their wheels looking into their men, ignoring important details.

One small example: Exeter gets the ransom demand in an envelope that is shoved through his letterbox (the ransom note itself, by the way, is never asked for by the police or the prosecutor, which seemed odd). Exeter says the kidnappers did not give him any way to communicate with them. But he also said that he had insisted that he be allowed to have at least one man accompany him to the ransom drop. How did he do that? No phones in 1871, so he couldn’t call them.

The plot is too full of holes and inconsistencies to recount, and what happens at the trial is ridiculous.

It was nice to catch up with favorite characters, although Hester is really just a stage prop in this book, and Scuff/Will makes only a cameo appearance. David Colacci does a good job with the narration.

2 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Wow, caught me by surprise, sort of

I love the Monk series and there has been only one I didn't care for (when Hester got kidnapped). So, for the first half or more of this book I thought, "Oh no, Anne Perry is going by the way of so many of my favorite authors and giving it half an effort. It seemed to drag. I guessed who the guilty person was almost at the beginning because it seemed so obvious to me. I thought, "Monk's is losing his unique intuition that he doesn't see this clearly". Well, as the book progressed and I was just about to turn it off out of frustration and a bit of boredom, it suddenly became very intriguing. So, Anne Perry did it again. This time in leading us astray and then presenting a surprising ending. And, oh yes, we get to see more of Hooper, a character of which I have grown fond. Hang in there if you feel like I did at the first half. It is worth it.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Quite Good -- Vintage Perry

4 stars instead of 5 due to too much dragging of the story in the first half and not enough development of same in the second half. Also, not enough involvement of Hester Monk. Her earlier books revolved as much around Hester as Monk. She makes the stories so much richer. Overall I enjoyed the book and the reading of it.

1 person found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Definitely Addictive in a good way

I really enjoyed this series so much that I listened to 3-4 books per week.
The characters were well developed and I felt as if I got to know them.
I had just finished the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series and was reluctant to start this series based on the tv show. I was so wrong.
I couldn’t stop listening I’m only sorry that I finished.
The first few books were narrated by Davina Porter who is my all time favorite. David Colacci was also very good.
Anne Perry is now on my favorite author list.
I would recommend that you start with book 1 in order to get a real understanding of the characters. And of course they all ended on a positive note, I would have liked a bit more of an ending. Looking forward to the next one

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

One of Anne Perry's best stories.

I gave it 4 stars because it needs at least a 20 minute epilogue as do ALL her books.

3 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent novel

Just when I thought the Monk series couldn’t get better, Anne Perry scores again! This book grabbed my attention from the very beginning! The narration is excellent, and the characters beautifully delineated. I loved the new attention on Hooper.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Not one of Monk's better mysteries.

a good deal of repetition throughout the story. a little oversight in places, when this was not necessary. Not one of Ms. Perry's better books, although the person responsible for the murder was a nicely hidden twist.