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Crow Planet  By  cover art

Crow Planet

By: Lyanda Lynn Haupt
Narrated by: Christine Williams
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Publisher's summary

There are more crows now than ever. Their abundance is both an indicator of ecological imbalance and a generous opportunity to connect with the animal world. Crow Planet reminds us that we do not need to head to faraway places to encounter "nature". Rather, even in the suburbs and cities where we live we are surrounded by wild life such as crows, and through observing them we can enhance our appreciation of the world's natural order. Crow Planet richly weaves Haupt's own "crow stories" as well as scientific and scholarly research and the history and mythology of crows, culminating in a book that is sure to make readers see the world around them in a very different way.

©2009, 2011 Lyanda Lynn Haupt (P)2020 Little, Brown & Company

Critic reviews

"A personal book, one that uses [Haupt] and her fondness for crows to cast its interests toward large concepts such as conservation, the environment, and learning to live more thoughtfully." (Irene Wanner, Seattle Times)

"With her sensitivity, careful eye and gift for language, Haupt tells her tale beautifully...immersing us in a heady hybrid of science, history, how-to and memoir." (Erika Schickel, Los Angeles Times)

"If you live in a city and want to expand your awareness of the natural world, Crow Planet would be a compelling and inspirational book. If you love or hate or are mystified by crows, it is an essential one." (Joseph Bednarik, The Oregonian)