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Publisher's Summary

Updated to include the Black Lives Matter movement, the presidency of Barack Obama, the rise of hate speech on the Internet, and more. 

Since the publication of the first edition of Critical Race Theory in 2001, the United States has lived through two economic downturns, an outbreak of terrorism, and the onset of an epidemic of hate directed against immigrants, especially undocumented Latinos and Middle Eastern people. On a more hopeful note, the country elected and re-elected its first black president and has witnessed the impressive advance of gay rights. 

As a field, critical race theory has taken note of all these developments, and this primer does so as well. It not only covers a range of emerging new topics and events, it also addresses the rise of a fierce wave of criticism from right-wing websites, think tanks, and foundations, some of which insist that America is now colorblind and has little use for racial analysis and study. 

Critical Race Theory is essential for understanding developments in this burgeoning field, which has spread to other disciplines and countries. The new edition also covers the ways in which other societies and disciplines adapt its teachings and, for listeners wanting to advance a progressive race agenda, includes new questions for discussion, aimed at outlining practical steps to achieve this objective.  

Critical Race Theory is wonderfully read by Karen Chilton, acclaimed narrator of The New Jim Crow.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2017 New York University (P)2019 Echo Point Books & Media, LLC

What listeners say about Critical Race Theory: An Introduction, Third Edition

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An Excellent, Academic Introduction

I’m currently neither a proponent nor an opponent of critical race theory but I wanted to get an overview of the theory on its own terms. This book is a very accessible and detailed introduction. It has an academic style that seems to have been intended as a university textbook. As an introduction it is heavier on exposition than argument. I was pleased to find that it was more informative than persuasive in its presentation, mostly just presenting the issues and laying out the various positions on points of disagreements, both among critical race theorists and between critical race theorists and its critics.

42 people found this helpful

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CRT falls apart on analysis

Audible is not a good format if you want to dig deeper. The thesis is weak and falls apart as the chapters progress pushing the thesis. Weak discussion of CRT in educational setting. Definitely not a game changer book; won't help win folks over to CRT policy.

12 people found this helpful

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A foundational text for thought and practice!

This book lays the foundation for s beginning of understanding how race rears its ugly head in many areas of life. It must be identified if it is to be eradicated.

12 people found this helpful

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The Darwin award of bad ideas

I've read a lot of philosophy and I gotta say, this was so obtuse and dishonest, it's difficult where to start. it constantly attempts toanipulate it's reader rather than explain ANYTHING out, and then continues to bash your head in with more nonsensical idiocy.
Almost no one wants to see racism prevail, yet this book implies it's everywhere, at every level of society.
Horrible. just....horrible.

11 people found this helpful

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Decent overview of CRT and good narrator

A good introduction to the ideas of CRT. The book even has a chapter on possible critiques of CRT that help the book “seem” impartial. However, for those who have listened here are some questions to ask yourself.

1. What dangers exist in making your core philosophy a critique of the dominant viewpoint?

2. CRT is critical of capitalism, rationalism, colorblindness and many other things. It is never critical of Marxism or Communism. In fact it mentions an influx of Marxist thinkers in a certain situation as a positive turn of events. Is CRT ever critical of Marxism? If not, why?

3. How viable is CRT outside the United States? What happens if you explain CRT to someone in a less privileged/dominant Country than yours and they disagree with you? Who is right? If you come from a western dominant culture, as does CRT, how does that dynamic effect the conversation?

4. Chapter 1 begins by saying that CRT deals with the situations where race “seems” to play a role in an interaction. Is there anyway to scientifically test this assumption? If not, what dangers exist with creating laws, policies, and culture beliefs that are based on a philosophy which sometimes draws from accurate data or assumptions but sometimes makes inaccurate assumptions?


Chapter 1 begins by suggesting there are instances where race “seems” to play a role in the way a POC is treated and these are

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Excellent questions

I saw at least one other reviewer say that this was a book written by lawyers for lawyers. Maybe so. But I tend to think what this does is it identifies the questions that we all need to consider; I found it very balanced and daring to ask all of the what if questions for both sides. I highly recommend it, to anyone who wants to check their thinking. Especially with what’s going on in the American culture 2021. I find it horribly saddening that the virulent opposition to CRT apparently does not want to discuss the questions that are being raised. These are utterly fair questions.

10 people found this helpful

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opens one eye while clising the other

Critical race theory can make you aware of various disadvantages suffered by various minority groups, especially American Blacks. However, it also promotes simplistic understandings of society: every phenomenon is understood in terms of relations of oppression and/or exploitation. When all you have is a hammer everything looks like a nail. Major issues such as high levels of criminality and low academic achievement are left unaddressed; instead, there is much discussion of rates of incarceration and the alleged unfairness of conventional measures of academic achievement. Also, I sense a tendency to understand society in terms of a monolithic pyramid of increasing privilege with straight white men at its pinnacle.

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Bad Storytelling

The use of storytelling is a weak device in that its use focuses on dramatic examples and strawman arguments.


In no way does this dogmatic "theory" seek to achieve a United States. The denial of conservative thinking, placing groups as oppressor and oppressed, the villainizing of whites, and placing a ceiling on minority abilities are all destructive toward empowering our American society to confront systemic issues and fulfill our God given decree that "all men are created equal." This book doesn't even provide a constructive means of improving the minority station!


Considering that most of the examples of urban minorities and oppression occur in liberal thinking cities, it may be that the Marxist ideologies of altruistic intent are being confronted, but with placing the blame on conservatives.  I suppose it's true that the road to hell is paved with good intentions. It must also be true that if you say a lie often enough, it starts to sound believable.


America is the most amalgamated society to ever exist in human history. To deny this fact  fuels this dangerous doctrine that is gaining increased use in America's schools.

With our melting pot in mind, we will obviously have faults that should be faced. However, I dare anyone to find an example of America to have ever existed in its most unique quality... diversity and overcoming its inherent challenges.


I encourage all to listen and read this book not because of its value, but rather as a self defense to combat its radicalism.


America is way better than this book will ever note.


God bless America!

8 people found this helpful

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Well read and very interesting

This was well read, and topic is cogent and timely. it seems to.me it's better to have a written copy, even if just to follow along. The book itself is clearly intended for a classroom environment.

6 people found this helpful

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incoherent

unfortunately, the book deals with this controversial but interesting topic confusingly, picking negatives from across an incoherent array of events. it's subjectively narrated from an American minority point of view while claiming to be universal. incoherent. anti white. anti capitalist. purely defeatist.

5 people found this helpful

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  • Alex
  • 12-31-20

Helpful but poor production

I found this a helpful introduction to CRT - exactly what I was after. I remain unconvinced of it but it does offer some helpful insights. This recording was let down by sound engineering - evident corrections were inserted awkwardly into the otherwise good narration - and the ponderous citing of references in full.