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Consent

A Memoir of Unwanted Attention
Narrated by: Kathleen McInerney
Length: 10 hrs and 14 mins
3.5 out of 5 stars (7 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"Consent is compelling and disturbing and a welcome expansion of our urgent conversation" (Rebecca Traister)

Donna Freitas has lived two lives. In one life, she is a well-published author and respected scholar who has traveled around the country speaking about Title IX, consent, religion, and sex on college campuses. In the other, she is a victim, a woman who suffered and suffers still because she was stalked by her graduate professor for more than two years.  

As a doctoral candidate, Freitas loved asking big questions, challenging established theories, and sinking her teeth into sacred texts. She felt at home in the library, and safe in the book-lined offices of scholars whom she admired. But during her first year, one particular scholar became obsessed with Freitas' academic enthusiasm. He filled her student mailbox with letters and articles. He lurked on the sidewalk outside her apartment. He called daily and left nagging voicemails. He befriended her mother, and made himself comfortable in her family's home. He wouldn't go away. While his attraction was not overtly sexual, it was undeniably inappropriate, and most importantly - unwanted.

In Consent: A Memoir of Unwanted Attention, Donna Freitas delivers a forensic examination of the years she spent stalked by her professor, and uses her nightmarish experience to examine the ways in which we stigmatize, debate, and attempt to understand consent today.
 

©2019 Donna Freitas (P)2019 Hachette Audio

Critic Reviews

"Donna Freitas combs through the emotional knots that form when a mentor's attention becomes inappropriate and manipulative. With sharp attention, she separates the many strands of consent one by one. A riveting, significant examination of the forces that push a student into silence about unwanted attention." (Idra Novey, award-winning author of Those Who Knew and Ways to Disappear)

"Freitas' delicate study of her torment and its devastating effects, which raises thorny, meaningful questions about how to define consent, is an important testament for the #MeToo era." (Publisher's Weekly)

"A groundbreaking resource for educators, administrators, students, and survivors, the book explores an issue many would prefer to ignore.A potent memoir of stalking with special resonance in the era of #MeToo. (Kirkus, starred review)

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  • LG H
  • Las Vegas, NV
  • 08-17-19

Important read

This is an important book. If you have a young woman in college or are a young woman in college you should read this book. Of course it doesn't have to be college the work place is subject to the same harassment. This book must be read with an open mind, the writing style is different but I believe brilliant. It puts you in the mind of the subject and helps you understand the effects of stalking and harassment from someone who has power over you. An effect that can change the course of your life.

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Rambling, Unfocused

I've been listening to this book about two hours, and I'm terribly bored. I am on Chapter 5, but only because I've skipped ahead to the next chapter about half way through each chapter, hoping desperately the author will eventually focus in on the story the cover of the book promised to tell. I keep wondering why she keeps relaying completely unrelated peripheral stories from her childhood. They don't seem to have any importance to the story, but seem more like she is doing what I used to do when the teacher assigned a 1000 word essay on a subject on which I had only 250 words to say. I'm bored as hell, and about to give up if she doesn't get to the point by the next chapter.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful