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Captive Audience  By  cover art

Captive Audience

By: Susan P. Crawford
Narrated by: Carol Hendrickson
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Publisher's Summary

Ten years ago, the United States stood at the forefront of the Internet revolution. With some of the fastest speeds and lowest prices in the world for high-speed Internet access, the nation was poised to be the global leader in the new knowledge-based economy. Today that global competitive advantage has all but vanished because of a series of government decisions and resulting monopolies that have allowed dozens of countries, including Japan and South Korea, to pass us in both speed and price of broadband. This steady slide backward not only deprives consumers of vital services needed in a competitive employment and business market - it also threatens the economic future of the nation.

This important book by leading telecommunications policy expert Susan Crawford explores why Americans are now paying much more but getting much less when it comes to high-speed Internet access. Using the 2011 merger between Comcast and NBC Universal as a lens, Crawford examines how we have created the biggest monopoly since the breakup of Standard Oil a century ago. In the clearest terms, this book explores how telecommunications monopolies have affected the daily lives of consumers and America's global economic standing.

©2013 Susan Crawford (P)2013 Audible, Inc.
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

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Great info, dry delivery

I highly recommend listening to this book because it brings context to the internet situation we have today and draws allegory with similar situations we surmounted in the past in regard to railroads and electricity. Just be ready for a flat, robotic delivery by the reader.

1 person found this helpful

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Thorough, even-handed and alarming

Any additional comments?

Performance took some getting used to for me but was excellent overall. This is an alarming and infuriating expose on internet service in the US. Very even-handed apart from an occasional subjective comment or conclusion, but never manipulative or to the detriment of the well-researched and presented facts. Certain sections are perhaps a little longer than necessary but otherwise an excellent book.

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Funny How Little Has Changed Since This Was Writte

Everyone should read the author's update to this "Fiber". However, it's interesting to see how little has changed in over a decade. My only gripe, is that the author doesn't talk about the possible dangers if radiation from wireless. 99% of this book is fantastic.

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A bit confusing

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Probably not. It's okay if you're really into the material, but I work in the telco industry and even I found the terms she uses to be confusing. Not a great narrative in there.