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Publisher's Summary

In this engaging and intriguing work, renowned Japanese psychologist Hayao Kawai examines his own personal experience of how a Japanese became a Jungian psychoanalyst and how the Buddhism in him gradually reacted to it.

Kawai reviews his method of psychotherapy and takes a fresh look at I in the context of Buddhism. His analysis, divided into four chapters, provides a new understanding of the human psyche from the perspective of someone rooted in the East.

Kawai begins by contemplating his personal koan: "Am I a Buddhist and/or a Jungian?" His honest reflections parallel Jung's early skepticism about Buddhism and later his positive regard for Buddha's teachings. He then relates how the individuation process is symbolically and meaningfully revealed in two philosophical and artistic picture series, one Eastern and one Western.

After exploring the Buddhist conception of the ego and the self, which is the opposite of to the Western view, Kawai expands psychotherapy to include sitting in silence and holding contradictions or containing opposites.

Drawing on his own experience as a psychoanalyst, Kawai concludes that true integration of East and West is both possible and impossible. Buddhism and the Art of Psychotherapy is an enlightening presentation that deepens the listener's understanding of this area of psychology and Eastern philosophy.

The book is published by Texas A&M University Press.

©1996 Hayao Kawai (P)2016 Redwood Audiobooks

Critic Reviews

"A remarkable book by a remarkable man." ( Journal of Analytical Psychology)
"Get out your best Mikasa and pour yourself a cup of tea, dear reader. This is a good one." ( Spring)
"In a self-effacing style that fails to dim the brilliance of his intellect and intuition, Kawai explores the differences between the Japanese and Western ego." ( The Bloomsbury Review)

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Profile Image for Emils Petracenoks
  • Emils Petracenoks
  • 03-13-18

Obsolete and non-scientific

Psychoanalysis mentioned here is obsolete. Another handawing instead of doing scientificly-backed narrative. Could be interesting as an illustration of an exercise in rationalization of practices of psychoanalysts.

1 person found this helpful