• Becoming Whole

  • Jung's Equation for Realizing God
  • By: Leslie Stein
  • Narrated by: Cris Dukehart
  • Length: 8 hrs and 1 min
  • 3.8 out of 5 stars (53 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

A thrilling exploration of how Carl Jung found the equation for realizing the divine through personal consciousness.

In 1951, Carl Jung published what he considered the highest synthesis and exposition of the transformation of Self and the discovery of the divine in one of his latest and most difficult works, Aion. The equation’s complexity and uncharacteristic elements of mysticism have caused it to fall by the wayside in traditional Jungian and psychological analysis. No major work has tackled this fascinating concept until now.

Leslie Stein, a disciple of noted Jungian analyst Rix Weaver, here explores this groundbreaking equation to its fullest capacity. Tracing the roots of Jung’s research back to his influences in the world of the Kabbalah and Sufi mysticism, and grounding the more esoteric philosophy toward the modern sense of identity, Stein has produced both a rigorous work of scholarship on a major figure and a guide that challenges listeners to reflect on our own truths.

©2012 Leslie Stein (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about Becoming Whole

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Jung - Brilliant as Always, but Advanced

As a student of Jung's writing and approach, this book is indispensable, but its complexity requires a hard copy as well, as another reviewer pointed out. There are perhaps some Jungian scholars who could do with just this Audible version, but even they would want a hard copy as well I would think.

I am happy to have this Audible version as well as the Kindle version because the book contains so much that deep study is warranted.

The narrator is definitely an acquired taste. She sounds like a female Stephen Hawking after three or more generations of speech generation development. It's a remarkable, if slightly creepy voice for this book. The book's dry nature of important, Jungian depth psychology concepts could use more emotion. And the "young" pronunciation of Jung should never have happened. Don't the narrators have a director who would correct that?

8 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Jung is not pronounced 'young'!!

How could the performance have been better?

The narrator mispronounces Jung through the entire book. Considering that the book is about Jung's theory, it's hard to overlook.

7 people found this helpful

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very slow

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

the reader is very slow and puts you to sleep. love jung and his philosophy, but I have not been able to listen through this book, very complicated and technical, difficult to follow.

6 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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I thought the readers need to know pronunciation?

The book is fascinating. Parallels and some polemic with the Sufi, Kabbala and Indian mysticism and philosophy are presented, which makes it interesting for any explorer. What surprised me was that Audible produced a book with a reader who mispronounces even the name of the book! You have to be prepared to endure the whole book with the name of Jung pronounced as "young" and many other non-English names and words tortured into caricatures. Well, at least it is an audio-book, presumably better than computer-read. I am grateful for that.

6 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Mispronunciation of names is terrible

What disappointed you about Becoming Whole?

The narrator.

What didn’t you like about Cris Dukehart’s performance?

The narrator's mispronunciation of both Jung's and Ibn 'Arabi's names drove me nuts. I quit listening and bought the printed book.

Any additional comments?

Definitely worth reading by those doing individuation and students of Jung and mystical traditions like Sufism.

5 people found this helpful

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Computer generated Voice?

What disappointed you about Becoming Whole?

I am not disappointed in becoming whole... but the book's narrator sounds like a computer. I'm returning the audible version and buying the book.

Would you ever listen to anything by Leslie Stein again?

No.

What didn’t you like about Cris Dukehart’s performance?

I did not like it. Sounds like a computer generated voice.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Vague disgust.

Any additional comments?

No. Just returning the purchase.

4 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Ok, If you say so.

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

This book wouldn't turn a person off on Carl Jung, but it doesn't promote him either. It is a supplemental work, and it would be best to purchase the hard copy as there are many illustrations that the audio book listener misses out on.

Would you be willing to try another one of Cris Dukehart’s performances?

The voice is not unpleasant. It is hard to use this work, which is quite unemotional, as a measure of a reader's talents.

Could you see Becoming Whole being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

As a feature film, I could easily see Joe Pesci as the Imago Dei.

Any additional comments?

This book is like listening to a doctoral dissertation about Carl Jung. It doesn't get much more exciting than that. Don't let this book be your introduction into Jung's work, because it does not introduce. It gives explanations of equations that primarily relate consciousness to alchemy. If that turns you on, go for it.

4 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Excellent!!!

Great explanation of the equation found in Jung's Aion, albeit with some noticeable mispronunciations. It is definitely well worth a listen.

2 people found this helpful

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Buy the printed book.

This book by Leslie Stein is a remarkable work and a valuable contribution to the post-Jungian corpus of writings. Listening to this recording with any enjoyment or even moderate comprehension is simply impossible. Sometimes the voice sounds computer-generated, and throughout the book, the mispronunciations make it impossible to follow. Many of the technical terms from Analytical Psychology are mispronounced, which may be excusable except in a commercially-produced audiobook. However, even ordinary words are mispronounced. The one that made me return the audiobook was "sinehkwanahn," with the accent on the second syllable, for "sine qua non"). Unfortunate, and perhaps Audible will re-record the book, either giving the present narrator a chance for coaching when reading literature such as this or else with another narrator.

1 person found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

This book is read by a computer. Ridiculous.

If you want a book read to you by a computer then this is the book for you!

1 person found this helpful

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