Bandwidth

An Analog Novel, Book 1
Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
Series: The Analog Novels, Book 1
Length: 9 hrs and 56 mins
3.5 out of 5 stars (291 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

A rising star at a preeminent political lobbying firm, Dag Calhoun represents the world’s most powerful technology and energy executives. But when a close brush with death reveals that the influence he wields makes him a target, impossible cracks appear in his perfect, richly appointed life.

Like everyone else, Dag relies on his digital feed for everything - a feed that is as personal as it is pervasive, and may not be as private as it seems. As he struggles to make sense of the dark forces closing in on him, he discovers that activists are hijacking the feed to manipulate markets and governments. Going public would destroy everything he’s worked so hard to build, but it’s not just Dag’s life on the line - a shadow war is coming, one that will secure humanity’s future or doom the planet to climate catastrophe. Ultimately, Dag must decide the price he’s willing to pay to change the world. 

©2018 Eliot Peper (P)2018 Brilliance Publishing, Inc., all rights reserved.

What listeners say about Bandwidth

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

What. A. Ride. Peper’s Best Yet!

Unless 10 other truly unbelievably good books are written this year – Bandwidth will make my top books of 2018 without blinking an eye. I’m a fan of Peper’s work – but this is on another level. Sure, there are some of the same players (just a few callbacks to companies and places) but the world that Peper created is one I don’t think I’ll ever forget. Just like the first time I read Jurassic Park – I’ll never forget Isla Nublar (even without the movies) – Bandwidth is set in a world that you can tell Peper took some time to craft and get just right.

The story follows a lobbyist as he tries to figure out just where he belongs. An orphan raised by the system (orphanage after orphanage) he has something to prove to the world and wants to make a name for himself at his new firm where he was just named partner. But things are as they seem when he stumbles across room 412. He doesn’t know who did it or how they pulled it off – but he needs to figure it out. This launched Dag into a world that he couldn’t believe existed and will force him to challenge everything he holds dear.

Where to start – as I stated above – the world building in Bandwidth is top notch. It’s a perfect near-future world that felt chillingly real. I can’t even get into any of the details because it will take away from the way that Peper builds each place and each even up. From the issues around Southern California to the event that causes him to become orphaned – Peper paints a terrifyingly real future that felt more fact than fiction.

The feed and its use within Bandwidth is also something that I can tell that Peper spent some time figuring out. Its just one of those “of course that’s where it’ll go” moments – but the way it is written about makes it feel so realistic I found myself both glad it’s not here yet and missing it.

P.J. Ochlan does a perfect job narrating this and really getting into the Dag character. As Dag develops on the pages you can feel Ochlan’s version of him morph with him. It was truly a stellar performance by a great narrator. He really helped bring Peper’s words to life.

Without giving much more away – Bandwidth is Peper’s best work to date. Easily one of those novels I’ll have a hard time moving on from.

11 people found this helpful

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Uninspiring Narration

While I enjoyed reading this book, the accompanying audio was uninspiring.

I will often switch back and forth between reading and audio. In most cases the audio is a great compliment, delivered by talented voice actors who breathe life into the author's words.

This reading was so flat that at time I suspected it was computer generated.

I suppose it will help me fall to sleep.

4 people found this helpful

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Not familiar with the topic

Hurried to finish, to see where we were going, but surprised and liked the ending

3 people found this helpful

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really interesting. feels very true to reality.

loved it. ran through it happily. very real characters. feels like soon to be reality.

3 people found this helpful

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good sorry, but read it

The story was an excellent critique of today's social media conglomerate driven society that ignores climate change for convenience. it had some fun twists.

However, aside from characterization, narration was horrendous. The voice actor repeats the same cadence ad infinitum. It's like a news caster selling cheep headlines. I got through the whole thing but it was consistently painful unless characters were speaking. I must say I was impressed with the accent out Tsu. I could hear the south African with in the oriental.

2 people found this helpful

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This novel made me think!

On the positive side it made me think about if Google or Facebook could become the global political powerhouse that CommonWealth is in this novel. CommonWealth controls publicly available information to the point it is more powerful than any government and threatens to become the world government. The strongest part of the novel is the author's short afterward.

Bandwidth also made me think about:
1. How Audible could classify near-term political science fiction as suspense mystery/thriller.
2. How any listener could rate Bandwidth 4 star or 5 star.
3. How smart the author was to make Bandwidth free with Kindle Unlimited.

11 people found this helpful

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Never quite clear where this was going..

This offering is at times great, at times maddeningly messy, and at times meandering. It is certainly a thoughtful piece, intended for listeners who want to make a difference ( even if they don't know it yet ). The performance, at times inconsistent, is strong for the most part, and Ochlan continues to show his chops as a diverse character creator.
On balance, I liked this offering, and wanted to give it a higher rating, but just couldn't. All that said, I do believe most listeners who enjoy "my kind of books" will enjoy this one as well. Recommended with slight caveats.

1 person found this helpful

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Thought provoking and fun!

This excellent tale explores technology and how it shapes who we are. It also delves into whether the end justifies the means, as well as the law of unintended consequences.

1 person found this helpful

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Gave me Goosebumps

Well crafted, Eliot Peper is a fabulous story teller. I enjoyed his telling of the store and PJ Ochlans narration as much as the plot itself. There were a couple of chapters that dragged, but overall I enjoyed the story. It’s a scary spectre of what could lie ahead.

1 person found this helpful

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Timely Tale of Near Future

Dag Calhoun is a hot young lobbyist who can expertly navigate the turbulent political and corporate waters to get his clients what they want and need. But when he finds himself manipulated from every direction, the unpredictable currents grow that much more treacherous. Each time he thinks he has found a way to achieve his goals, the goal posts move, and he falls deeper and deeper down the rabbit hole (to mix my metaphors).

Eliot Peper's near-future corporate techno-thriller is quite timely, the main themes being the manipulation of social media feeds (a la the 2016 election) and the impending consequences of climate change. We wonder why climate change deniers dominate the political landscape -- Peper shines a light on a motivation we may have failed to consider: the big money to be made as a result of climate change, and the puppetmasters of the powers that be who have a strong vested interest in how this unfolds.

But ultimately, what makes a novel work are the characters, and Peper has done well to create credible, fully realized characters, especially Dag, the protagonist who battles various inner demons while battling real world rivals. At face value, many of the characters seem drawn from familiar tropes, but Peper bring them to life as unique creations. Looking forward to the upcoming continuation of this series.

1 person found this helpful

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  • epredator / Ian Hughes
  • 06-28-20

A clever look at a looming political future

The mix of political intrigue and advances in communication technology and social media firm the basis for a very human story. The language used is poetic and visually intriguing. The twists and turns continue to surprise, not in a make you jump way, but in an almost car driving rally drift set of directional slides. A really good listen presented with great characterisation.

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  • Technomouseuk
  • 09-23-18

great story

very involving ,great characters and lots of of will be following this author on Goodreads

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  • Lee Davis
  • 08-30-18

Terrible narration, ordinary story

Didn’t work for me at all and the narrator is not suited to fiction at all. Way too cheesy.

Also the story started quite well but just became disengaging and I could not get into it. DNF at 70%