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Publisher's Summary

"Every child knows how the story ends. The wicked pirate captain is flung overboard, caught in the jaws of the monster crocodile who drags him down to a watery grave. But it was not yet my time to die. It's my fate to be trapped here forever, in a nightmare of childhood fancy, with that infernal, eternal boy."

Meet Captain James Benjamin Hook, a witty, educated Restoration-era privateer cursed to play villain to a pack of malicious little boys in a pointless war that never ends. But everything changes when Stella Parrish, a forbidden grown woman, dreams her way to the Neverland in defiance of Pan's rules. From the glamour of the Fairy Revels to the secret ceremonies of the First Tribes to the mysterious underwater temple beneath the Mermaid Lagoon, the magical forces of the Neverland open up for Stella as they never have for Hook. And in the pirate captain himself, she begins to see someone far more complex than the storybook villain.

With Stella's knowledge of folk and fairy tales, she might be Hook's last chance for redemption and release if they can break his curse before Pan and his warrior boys hunt her down and drag Hook back to their never-ending game.

Alias Hook is a beautifully and romantically written adult fairy tale perfect for fans of Gregory Maguire and Paula Brackston.

©2014 Lisa Jensen (P)2014 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Brilliant, captivating and clever

Any additional comments?

Five reasons to grab your earbuds and listen to Alias Hook

1. The writing is simply wonderful from the way that it flowed to the vivid details of Neverland. This is meant for adults and the language can get colorful, but it also offered a unique perspective casting Hook and his crew in a whole new light.

2. Captain James Benjamin Hook. Ralph Lister did an excellent job of giving him voice and Jenson truly fleshed him out making me see this pirate in an entirely new light. Gone are the images from movies and the Disney animation.

3. Stella Parrish is a grown woman who makes her way to Neverland and forever changes James. I adored this snarky, clever woman. She says what she thinks, and it was often hilarious. Her reasons for dreaming her way to Neverland were interesting, and her role in the tale was well dome.

4. It is Neverland! There are battles with the Lost Boys, secrets, fairies and of course Peter Pan.

5. Alias Hook while based on Peter Pan completely stands on its own and offers a new twist on Neverland.. Lessons were learned, a romance developed, and both Jenson and Lister weaved their magic making me lose myself in the story.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Interesting read

I like fairy tale re-imaginings, but often they just don't compare to the original or almost ruin the original for me if they're too big a disaster. This one was surprisingly interesting and fresh. I really enjoyed the story and the writing - there's just 2 things that REALLY bothered me about this book. Slight spoilers below:
It's made clear throughout the book that Neverland is a haven for children who need to escape the real world for while, and all the children there, including Pan, are innocent (until they grow up a bit, anyway.) I agree that children can be heartless, careless, even cruel and yet still remain ignorantly innocent. I cannot, however, for one second hold with the premise that this vicious, blood-thirsty, prideful little scorpion of a boy is at all innocent. Pan has lived for who knows how many millennia in Neverland, lording his power over every inhabitant and killing anyone who defies him. The only thing that keeps him from being labeled the murderer that he is, is his childish code of "fair" and the dubious fact of his victims being "no longer innocent." Not to mention his complete disregard for the happiness of the "Wendy's" who love him and serve him until they finally have enough of his selfishness and neglect and choose to leave his perfect little world. I guess only little boys deserve a haven in which to escape the real world! Honestly, if it weren't for the fact that Neverland truly is a haven for the Lorelei and the Indians, I'd root for the entire place to be destroyed. The boys Pan "saves" from the real world are shaped into immature, violent, befuddled wrecks who are incapable of independent thought when thrown back into the real world; until their adult lives become so unbearable that they dream their way BACK to Neverland, only to be murdered by their former friend and leader! Pan is truly a menace on society! If the author had just presented him that way from the beginning, and stopped presenting him as an innocent and pitiable character, I could've enjoyed the story more. I love a pitiable villain, I really do, but I need to see some reason to mix some love for him up with all the hate. I just couldn't feel anything for the evil brat, though.
Anyhow, I liked Hook's character arc, and the dynamic between Hook and Peter was engaging, in spite of this thorn in the plot.
The second thing: If you're writing a book with a specific theme of religion, and you or your characters want to pass judgement on Christianity, fine. But if you casually throw in 3 or 4 seething comments on my religion like dropping cockroaches amongst the buffet table, you're going to anger some people. It does nothing for the story but jar me out of it and eat away at the enjoyment I've gotten thus far. I literally laughed when the fairy queen tells Hook that his God "has no power here" and asks him if he fears the wrath of his "cruel" God when he gets back to the real world. The fact that the nameless creator of Neverland, who installed a truly cruel boy tyrant in this deceptively beautiful and magical land, is compared, even fictionally, to the God of the universe, is laughable. And no, God did not sacrifice his own son so that the world would fear him. It was done for love of us, to make a way back to him. Please don't casually drop a bomb that you know nothing about. The editor would've done better to delete these 3 or 4 offending sentences.
Looking back on my review, it seems like I disliked the book, but I really didn't. It WAS enjoyable. It certainly made me think about it afterwards.

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Ending felt rushed.

I really enjoyed this book but I felt the ending was kind of rushed. Like the author got tired and just finished it. Overall a good book!