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Publisher's Summary

In 1850 Charleston, South Carolina, brutality and cruelty simmer just under the genteel surface of Southern society. In an era where ladies are considered mere property, beautiful and headstrong Willow Hendricks' father has filled her life with turmoil, secrets, and lies. 

Her father rules her life until she finds a kindred spirit in spunky, outspoken Whitney Barry, a northerner from Boston. Together these Charleston belles are driven to take control of their own lives - and they are plunged into fear and chaos in their quest to fight for the rights of slaves. Against all odds, these feisty women fight to secure freedom and equality for those made powerless and persecuted by a supposedly superior race. 

Only when they've lost it all do they find a new beginning. 

Book 1 presents Willow and Whitney - and the listener - with the hardships the slaves endure at the hands of their white masters.

©2018 Huntson Press (P)2018 Huntson Press

What listeners say about A Slave of the Shadows

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4 hours left

UGH! I have 4 hours left & it’s a struggle!!! The Civil War era is one of my favorite times in history. I can’t get enough so I read/listen to anything (worthy) that’s based during that time period. I’m at Ch 39 of 81 & I just can’t go on! The story line is frivolous, the writing is nonsensical and way too modern for this time period. Pre Civil War the word ‘lame’ was used in the context of a horse or person unable to walk due to something wrong with their leg/foot. In the book the word ‘lame’ was used to describe an idea; something one of the characters had said. So, if the author isn’t going to research that period and just use it as a background for her ‘fluff’ then you can only imagine the content. And that is only one example of many. The story drags on and on and on... no excitement, no intrigue, nothing to really hold the reader’s attention. I feel like the Lone Ranger here amongst all these other glorious reviews but I stand by mine. Drivel, fluff, Harlequin-like, unrealistic, mindless words with no body or substance! Going to my Audible Library now & marking this one finished!

17 people found this helpful

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“Being a rich white woman is almost as bad as a slave “

Reading the title sums up what this book is about.
Being a rich white beautiful southern belle that travels and goes to school aboard is just a “notch” above a slave. This white savior poor southern load of crap book. This book is out of touch when it comes to slavery. She plays hero because her mammy the slave is nice and mad at Papa for not letting the little slave children play hide and seek. They didn’t do that back then. Slaves worked. They didn’t care if you were a child. It’s like a German woman trying to write a story in eyes of Jewish person in the Holocaust.

10 people found this helpful

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White Saviorism, Exhibit A and Errors Throughout

Reeks of white saviorism throughout. Seriously, if you want to understand the trope, this book is Exhibit A. The emphasis is on White angst and pain over the plight of enslaved Blacks and how wonderful the White heroine, Willow, is for becoming an Underground Railroad conductor. The heroine's slaves love their mistress and praise her repeatedly. Willow's "Mammy" calls her "angel gal." Mammy is a stereotype through and through. Mammy and her daughter ARE ACTUALLY FREE but they remain in SC and live as slaves because Mammy loves her White mistress so much. I can't even.

The dialogue and narration are thoroughly modern. Anachronistic names, especially heroine Willow. Characters are ridiculously self-aware. The characterization of Willow's father is inconsistent. He calls her "an abomination" just because she's a girl, but by the end, we discover he's really a good guy. Half the slave-holding Southern characters are secretly abolitionists. Yeah, right.

Hero picked on heroine at their one-room schoolhouse like something out of the Old West. In reality, girls and boys were not educated together in the Old South. They would have private tutors or they would attend sex-segregated boarding schools. Finley seems to have transposed a Hollywood version of the American West into the American South. There also wasn't a "general store" in Charleston. Heroine has her underwear around her ankles in an outhouse. In fact, women wore split-crotch drawers to make relieving themselves easier. Rice and Sea Island cotton weren't grown on the same plantation within land travel of Charleston. It's in the name (which Finley uses): Sea ISLAND cotton.

The pacing is all over the place, with frequent tangents into characters' backstories and a rushed, over-the-top ending. The titular "Slave of the Shadows" isn't an actual enslaved Black person but a White man, which basically tells you what you need to know about the real priorities of this book.

In the author's note at the end, Finley touts her "extensive research," but her actual story proves she did only superficial research and/or what she read didn't sink in. Willow and Whitney, two young White planters' daughters, casually go into Charleston unaccompanied by anyone but their enslaved driver. They don men's clothing and turn vigilante, kidnapping and whipping White rapists. They end up running Willow's plantation on their own by the end. Yeah, right.

This is a 21st-century fantasy of the American South. You can almost hear the White author patting herself on the back as her enslaved characters lavish praise on her enlightened White Mary Sue heroine.

On the plus side, Reagan Boggs does a fine job narrating the audiobook and has a lovely singing voice too.

3 people found this helpful

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Couldn't stop listening (spoiler alert)

This book was an honest and relatable account of a fictional character who mirrors the emotions and notions of pre-civil-war abolitionists. It may not be wholly historically accurate, but the spirit of a woman who, at the time, would have had no rights to an opinion of her own aside from which sandwiches she would like with her tea is refreshing. The narrator did a wonderful job of keeping the listener engaged and tuned in for more. There were some predictable moments (to anyone who is keen to pick up foreshadowing) and the "big reveal" at the end of the book was a bit lost on me, as I had surmised the outcome by about 1/4 of the way through the book. Overall, the story was heartwarming, even though some parts were mildly irritating (for example: Rita and James's roles in the endeavors of Mr. Hendricks, or lack thereof, was disappointing). I cannot elaborate more on my opinion of that matter without completely giving the book away, so we'll just leave it at that.

1 person found this helpful

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Amazingly Descriptive and Captivating

Beautiful narrated! Enjoy every scene down to the smallest detail. I wish book 2 was in audible form...now I have to wait!

1 person found this helpful

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mmmm

great story can't wait for the next book book two very exciting and I cannot wait to see what happens next

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Awesome story!! Narrator is riveting!

This book is so excellently written and keeps your attention all the way through to the end! It is also masterfully narrated and poignant in delivery! It is well worth your time to read or listen!

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Can't wait for the next!

this is a fantastic book. I loved. non stop. narration was also fantastic. highly recommend.

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excellent read

The story the set up was very nice. excellent read. a must read and nice purchase.

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Totally enjoyable

I totally enjoyed this story thanks to the fine writing and exceptional narration. I would also like to thank the author for her final note at the end of the reading that provided some additional information on women's rights of those times.

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  • allie johnson
  • 06-28-20

brilliant!

I loved this book, interesting, well written and well read. I'm looking forward to reading the next book.