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Publisher's Summary

During 12 unforgettable months in the middle of the turbulent '60s, America saw the rise of innovative new sounds that would change popular music as we knew it. In 1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music, music historian Andrew Grant Jackson (Still the Greatest: The Essential Songs of The Beatles' Solo Careers) chronicles a groundbreaking year of creativity fueled by rivalries between musicians and continents, sweeping social changes, and technological breakthroughs.

Jackson weaves fascinating and often surprising stories into a panoramic narrative of the seismic cultural shifts wrought by the Civil Rights Movement, feminism, Youthquake, the miniskirt, the Pill, psychedelics, and Vietnam. 1965 is a fascinating account of a defining year that produced some of the greatest songs, albums, and artists of all time.

©2015 Andrew Grant Jackson (P)2018 Tantor

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
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    4 out of 5 stars

interesting for rock and roll fans

fair amount of politics but I understand that politics were important in mid 60s rock music. lots of interesting information there's nothing particularly groundbreaking.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Juicy but over-thought

Loads of juicy nuggets of information, but over done in that every concept seems over thought. Too many references to Mr. tambourine Man and its influence on everything! Creativity seems diminished as a result.